Dundas Valley Tree Keepers' Heritage Tree Hunt 2009

+3

No comments posted yet

Comments

Slide 1

Heritage Tree Hunt poster

Slide 2

Who are the DVTK?

Slide 3

Why a Tree Hunt? The Dundas Valley is an area of incredible biodiversity. It is an area blessed with urban, rural and natural forested areas. This combined with being situated in southern Ontario and at the head of Lake Ontario; it is also steeped in Canadian culture and history.

Slide 4

What is a Heritage Tree? Ontario Urban Forest Council uses this definition.

Slide 5

Tree categories Native trees were identified for the Hamilton-Wentworth area based on the Forest Gene Conservation Association. Native species list for this district (ecodistrict 7E-3) . (e.g. American basswood, silver maple, red maple, sugar maple, white pine, hickory, black walnut, oak, tulip tree, American beech) Rare tree criteria from the Forest Gene Conservation Association (e.g., cucumber magnolia, Kentucky coffee tree, American elm, chinquapin oak) Large tree criteria based on DBH being 90% or better of “heritage DBH” that is used for the Neighbourwoods Tree Inventory by University of Toronto. It is the Neighbourwoods inventory approach that was used in both Dundas tree inventories 2007 and 2008

Slide 6

Heritage Tree Hunt boundaries

Slide 7

Nomination form

Slide 8

Nomination follow-up

Slide 9

Heritage Tree Hunt Judges Clare Crozier – Family in Dundas for 4 generations Eleanore and Richard Kosydar – Tierceron Design and Press publishing Paul O’Hara – Blue Oak Native Landscapes

Slide 10

And the winners are...

Slide 11

Outstanding Fall Colour Winner Sugar Maple, 455 Old Brock Rd, Dundas – nominator Barb Guild, Dundas Barb says “During the Fall people often stop in front of our house to take pictures of its magnificent colour. At its height it is breathtaking. I took a few pictures last year as I often do but they don't do it justice. When the leaves began to fall on the ground the entire area took on an aura of pink red and yellow - it was quite something! It always is every year. “

Slide 12

Kid-Friendly Tree Winner Willow, 20 Woodward Ave., Dundas – nominated by Simon Chase, Dundas Simon’s story: This willow tree is the favourite of all the neighbourhood children and admired by their parents as well. We have had children climbing it even when we are not home (something we do discourage) since it is next to a public vacant field which is route to a nearby public school. If one of them gets stuck, since it is easier to climb up a tree than back down, then we have to come out and rescue them. In the fall we pile leaves from our 3/4 acre property of maples and elms into a giant leaf pile right next to the tree so it can form both a play pile and a safer landing pad for any jumpers from the tree. When people first see its massive (20 feet in diameter) and gnarled trunk, they say it reminds them of a Harry Potter scene. Then the kids soon find out it is relatively easy to climb with all the burls and knotty projections, of course the fireman pole also makes for a quick getaway from the tree fort attached to the tree. The fireman pole was once anchored at the top by a metal bracket which would occasionally declamp itself and send the pole and any hanger on crashing to the ground like a falling tree. Fortunately, it has since become integrated into the actual tree, both metal bracket and each end pole are now well within the growing and live trunk of tree. The tree fort is over 20 years old but it's metal guy wires help stabilize it so we are only slightly nervous when 5 to 10 children are in the fort pretending they are pirates. I have also attached a very long double person swing to a high branch so one can go for giant swings. I have had to prune the spruce hedge lining the property line in order to allow the people swinging to careen well past the edge of our property out over the empty field next to our home. This is not an easy swing to ride since it is hard to climb up into and also takes a lot of effort to really get the giant pendulum action going. But then it is a thrill and even small children, my youngest is 4, enjoy it if they are safely ensconced next to an older youth or adult. Willows do drop branches frequently and this makes for regular spring and fall cleanup chores. Consequently, this willow has also caused major damage to the roof and trusses of our nearby garage. Nevertheless, we would never trade this willow for a safer and smaller tree -- as long as there are children who have so much fun with it.

Slide 13

Kid-Friendly Honourable Mention Bur Oak, Dundas Driving Park, Dundas – nominated by Susan Masterman, Dundas Susan says: Kid-Friendly climbing tree besides being part of Dundas history and the memories of countless families The DVTK would like to acknowledge the participation of children in the Heritage Tree Hunt. It is important to engage children in the awareness, appreciate and care of the trees around them. They are the future caretakers of our Heritage trees. Rachel Ryckman William Ryckman Samantha Kennedy Luke Kennedy Will Dickson (Age 12) Ruby West (Age 10) Brook Parker The Chase children

Slide 14

Large Tree Winner White Oak, Old Martin’s Rd, Dundas/Ancaster – nominated by Peter Stewart, Dundas This tree is 186 cm in diameter which is a diameter more than 90% of ‘heritage DBH’ that is used for the Neighbourwoods Tree Inventory by University of Toronto. The tree looks like two trees that grew together.

Slide 15

Native Tree Winner White Ash trees at Grove Cemetery, York Rd, Dundas – nominated by Katie West, Dundas Two White Ash trees are being honoured from Grove Cemetery. These trees are considered the winner of the Native category due to their size and that the Dundas Valley region is in the central range of the White Ash.

Slide 16

Native Tree Honourable Mention White Oak, 76 Inksetter Rd, Copetown – nominated by Rachel Ryckman, Ancaster A beautiful specimen of the native White Oak at 90% of heritage diameter used for Neighbourwoods Tree Inventory by University of Toronto

Slide 17

Native Tree Honourable Mention Bitternut Hickory, HRCA, Dundas – nominated by Bill Kennedy, Dundas This massive native Bitternut Hickory is 102 cm diameter placing it greater than the heritage diameter criteria used for the Neighbourwoods Tree Inventory by University of Toronto

Slide 18

Native Tree Honourable Mentions Black Cherry and White Pine, RBG North Shore, Hamilton – nominated by Thys Theysmeyer, RBG The RBG has an amazing abundance of native tree species. It is worth it to wander the many trails of the RBG! Two honourable mentions are: the Black Cherry at 92 cm diameter, 83% of heritage diameter and a White Pine in the woods on the north shore of Cootes Paradise. Thys says “This tree is the location of the first nesting eagles (2009) around Lake Ontario following their extirpation from the lake decades ago”.

Slide 19

Tree with a Story Winner Redbud, 6 Hillside Ave S, Dundas – nominated by Brian & Mary Grolla, Dundas Brian and Mary’s story: Our Redbud When we bought our house on Hillside Ave in 1987, we loved the large trees in the neighbourhood. One tree was particularly unique – our Redbud tree, Cercis Canadensis. It is Carolinian, so it won’t survive much further north than Dundas. The European version is known as a “Judas tree,” thought to be the tree on which Judas hanged himself. In Spain it is known as The Tree of Love. The heart shaped leaves offer welcome shade and the delicate flowers – when you look carefully – are shaped like tiny hummingbirds. My mother makes pressed flower cards from them each year. The distinctive blooms, in May, spring from spots all along each branch, not in clusters. When in bloom, our yard glows in a purple haze. But the real story of this tree is the number of babies it has spawned. The prolific seed pods drop in the fall and spread throughout our yard and in spring we have hundreds of Redbud sprouts. We have been giving them away and transplanting them now for 20 years. Our baby Redbuds range from Downtown Toronto to Niagara Falls, from Oakville to Paris. Most of our neighbours have 1-2 trees, many of our friends, work associates, family, our friends’ families, and strangers referred to us by friends have Redbuds. Some of our friends who’ve moved houses have come back for seconds or thirds! They are planted on the rail trail, (check the “Redbud Garden” at the Hillside park entrance in early May!) on farms, and outside “the Pearl Company.” One year RBG volunteers came and picked out 200 seedlings to sell at their plant sale. We have recently done a tally and been able to account for about 300 babies. The late Bruce Duncan came one spring in his Wellies, brought his own spade and was delighted to take home a few saplings for his enjoyment. Our Redbuds brighten the yards of Ariel Rogers, City Manager, Chris Murray and the original Colin Macdonald school (which was in a rescued century home moved to McNab St. Dundas). What started out as giving a seedling here and there grew into a guerrilla gardening bonanza. A private love has blossomed into a public display!

Slide 20

Flowering Tree Winner Kwanzan Cherry, 65 Victoria St, Dundas – nominated by Jennifer Powell-Fralick & Paul Fralick, Dundas Jennifer and Paul write: We moved into the house in January 2006 and loved the shape of the magnificent tree with its interesting trunk, but had no idea what it would look like in spring. The spring of 2007 brought our first display...and it was like the (pink) "icing on the cake" of our move to Dundas! The tree is like a beacon for the neighbourhood, drawing walkers who linger and photographers who take its picture….When the petals fall, everyone walking by and the many neighbourhood children enjoy the cascade of "pink snow" for several days. We are proud to be the new caretakers of a special Dundas tree that is like a springtime gift to the neighbourhood.

Slide 21

Flowering Tree Honourable Mention Magnolia, NE Corner of Sydenham & Park St, Dundas – nominated by Michelle Chin, Dundas Michelle wrote: This tree is the quintessential harbinger of spring that so many people enjoy at this busy intersection.

Slide 22

Flowering Tree Honourable Mention Magnolia, 25 Sanders Ave, Hamilton – nominated by Megan Coombes, Hamilton This beautiful magnolia is 20 metres tall. The photo speaks for itself. You can see someone standing by it dwarfed at the bottom right.

Slide 23

Rare Tree Winner Chinquapin Oak, Fisher’s Mill Park, King St W, Dundas – nominated by Emil Sekerak, Burlington Judges chose this Chinquapin Oak as the winner of the Rare tree category due to its being here at the northern reaches of its range in southern Ontario and being an outstanding specimen for size at 135 cm diameter which is 94% of a heritage diameter. It has long saw tooth leaves resembling a chestnut. Judge Clare Crozier will speak about historical significance of this tree.

Slide 24

Rare Tree Honourable Mention Kentucky Coffee tree, 27 South St, Dundas – nominated by Mary Johnston, Dundas The Kentucky Coffee tree is listed in the COSEWIC (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada). Rare Plants of Canada 1999 as a rare native. This particular tree has a diameter almost 20% larger than what is considered a heritage diameter at 109 cm. At the time of 2008 Dundas Trees Count Too inventory, the owner thought that this was the oldest Kentucky Coffee tree in Ontario.

Slide 25

Rare Tree Honourable Mention Cucumber tree, 30 South St W, Dundas – nominated by Gary Finchman, Dundas The Cucumber tree is also listed in the COSEWIC (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada). Rare Plants of Canada 1999 as a rare native. There are a few small populations in southern Ontario. It is one of the largest and cold-hardiest of magnolias and flowers are typically small and yellow-green in colour.

Slide 26

Historical Landmark Winner Bur Oak, Dundas Driving Park, Dundas – nominated by Susan Masterman, Dundas A tree may be historically important if it is associated with an historical event, building, space or person, or the nominator’s family history OR the tree is an historical landmark. There were several nominations for this massive native Bur Oak in the Dundas Driving Park. Winning nominator Susan Masterman wrote: This huge oak figures prominently in old photographs of the Driving Park and people's family photos. Judge Clare Crozier will add some comments.

Slide 27

Historical Landmark Honourable Mention Red Oak, 253 Hwy 8, Betzner Farm, West Flamborough – nominated by Gary & Shirley Betzner Shirley writes: This old oak tree stands at the very back of the farm, on the border of our fence line and the CN railway….It's very large. The tree is in considerable decline, and after every storm we go back to see how the old oak tree has fared. The farm has been in the family since 1817. This tree I believe to be at least 200 years, if not more. I picture this tree to have been a good sized tree when the railroad was dug many years ago. If only this tree could tell all the things it has seen. Maybe the tree was old enough at the time to have had workers eat their lunch under it!

Slide 28

Distinct Form Winner Japanese Maple, 1 Melville St, Dundas – nominated by Fred & Sharyn Hall, Dundas Distinct form criteria is the tree is majestic, striking or atypical, unusual or quirky. Fred and Sharyn wrote: A long time resident of Dundas recalled the tree was on the property by about 1920. We realize we are stewards of this wonderful tree and will pass it on to the next owners of 1 Melville Street. We have lived here for nearly 30 years and have come to appreciate that many people in the town have personal “ownership” of the tree. They bring their families to look at it, especially in its Fall scarlet colours. This ownership was underlined for us when, during a violent wind storm approximately 15 years ago, a large evergreen tree was uprooted and fell into the middle of our Japanese Maple, destroying the crown, or center, of the tree. People were so upset that they delivered sympathy cards to our house and cried to see what had happened. The Town offered to cut the tree down, but, in consultation with the Royal Botanical Gardens, we decided to leave it alone to see if it could recover. Happily it has renewed itself and new growth has covered the major trauma that the tree underwent.

Slide 29

Distinct Form Honourable Mention Osage Orange, 47 Market St N, Dundas – nominated by Mark & Janice Jeffree, Dundas This non-native’s natural range is in the Red River drainage of Oklahoma, Texas, and Arkansas. Wood used by the Osage Indians to make bows. Was commonly used a prairie farmland hedge rows due to its thorns. This subsequently lead to the invention of barbed wire! An aspect of its distinctness is its large yellowish-green fruits resembling oranges.

Slide 30

Distinct Form Honourable Mention European Beeches, 9 Victoria St, Dundas – nominated by Susan Masterman, Dundas Susan writes: This pair of monstrous beeches flank the front walkway to the front porch of 9 Victoria. "These beeches have survived on this property when the "Ghost"" house as it was known almost did not. ". Distinctive like the front pair of a giant sky-high elephant's legs and their brilliant fall colour can be seen from the Sydenham bridge.

Slide 31

Group of Trees Winner Eastern White Cedars, escarpment edge, Borer’s Falls, Dundas Peak, Webster’s Falls – nominated by Anne W. Parker The Dundas Valley is uniquely situated wrapped within the Niagara Escarpment. This has provided distinct habitat for very old Eastern White cedars (Thuja occidentalis) . Judge Paul O’Hara will speak about the cedars winner.

Slide 32

Group of Trees Honourable Mention Black Locusts, 21 Bonham Dr, Jerseyville – nominated by Paul Grimwood This is a wonderful grouping of very large black locusts, 4 of which were planted by Paul’s grandfather in 1880. Located off Jerseyville Rd east of HWY 52.

Slide 33

Trees of Note Before we announce the winner of the Best Tree Overall, the judges identified an additional group of trees of note that they also wished to acknowledge. They follow here.

Slide 34

Trees of Note Shagbark Hickory, 786 Governor’s Rd, Dundas Bigtooth Aspen, 30 Osler Dr, Dundas Black Oak, Grove Cemetery, York Rd, Dundas

Slide 35

Trees of Note Black Walnut, 73 Victoria St, Dundas Tricolour Beech, 155 Park St W, Dundas White Oak, 44 Hwy 8, Flamborough

Slide 36

Trees of Note Gingko, 11 Melville St, Dundas Redwoods, 3 Kemp Dr, Dundas Red Oak, Christ Church, Hwy 8, Flamborough

Slide 37

Trees of Note Silver Maple, 4 Mayfair Ave, Dundas And now for the winner of the Best Tree Overall

Slide 38

Best Tree Overall Winner Tulip, 35 Cross St, Dundas – nominated by Kim Newcombe, Hamilton The best tree overall received several nominations. Kim wrote: I would like to nominate this tree in honour of Jacqueline Wesley-James the late owner of 35 Cross St. in recognition of her love of trees. The tree is said to predate the construction of the house in 1845 and is the largest and oldest tulip tree in Ontario. over 100 ft. tall and 16 foot girth Other comments: This spectacular Tulip tree belonging to the Wesley-James family is Dundas' celebrity tree having been visited by tourist buses visiting Canada and the RBG. Beautiful tulips sprout each spring all over this tree. Judge Paul O’Hara will speak about natural history of the tulip Judge Clare Crozier will speak about the cultural history of the tulip

Slide 2

Who Are the DVTK? Volunteers from 2007 Dundas Trees Count by Environment Hamilton Over time other interested residents of Dundas and nearby communities Community volunteers inspired about promoting awareness and conservation of Dundas Valley trees

Slide 3

Why a Tree Hunt? To engage community in a fun way to identify trees worthy of recognition To increase community awareness of trees of the Dundas Valley To identify significant public trees to support conservation and propagation To identify heritage trees to the Trees Ontario Heritage Tree Program Other communities have had successful heritage tree hunts

Slide 4

What is a Heritage Tree? "a heritage tree is an outstanding specimen because of its size, form, shape, age, colour, rarity, genetic constitution or other distinctive community landmark; a specimen associated with an historic person, place, event or period; representative of a crop grown by ancestors and their successors that is at risk of disappearing from cultivation a specimen recognized by members of a community as deserving heritage recognition." (Courtesy of Paul Aird, Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto)

Slide 5

Tree Categories Native tree Rare tree Large tree Tree with distinct form Group of trees Flowering tree Outstanding fall colour Historical landmark Tree with a story Kid-friendly tree

Slide 6

Heritage Tree Hunt Boundaries

Slide 8

Nomination Follow-up Visit trees to confirm tree identity Confirm diameter measurement Take photos Categorize trees and provide tree selection criteria for judges

Slide 9

Our Judges Clare Crozier Local historian Dundas Historical Society Museum Eleanore and Richard Kosydar Landscape Photographers The Dundas Valley: Visions of Beauty Paul O’Hara Botanist, landscape designer Native plant gardening expert

Slide 10

And the Winners are...

Slide 11

Outstanding Fall Colour Winner Sugar Maple 455 Old Brock Rd, Dundas Nominator – Barb Guild, Dundas

Slide 12

Kid-Friendly Tree Winner Willow 20 Woodward Ave, Dundas Nominator – Simon Chase, Dundas

Slide 13

Kid-Friendly Honourable Mention Bur Oak Dundas Driving Park Nominator – Susan Masterman, Dundas

Slide 14

Large Tree Winner White Oak Old Martin’s Rd, Dundas/Ancaster Nominator – Peter Stewart, Dundas

Slide 15

Native Tree Winner White Ash Grove Cemetery, York Rd, Dundas Nominator – Katie West, Dundas

Slide 16

Native Tree Honourable Mention White Oak 76 Inksetter Rd, Copetown Nominator – Rachel Ryckman, Ancaster

Slide 17

Native Tree Honourable Mention Bitternut Hickory HRCA, Dundas Nominator – Bill Kennedy, Dundas

Slide 18

Native Tree Honourable Mentions Black Cherry & White Pine RBG North Shore, Hamilton Nominator – Thys Theysmeyer, RBG

Slide 19

Tree with a Story Winner Redbud 6 Hillside Ave S, Dundas Nominators – Brian & Mary Grolla, Dundas

Slide 20

Flowering Tree Winner Kwanzan Cherry 65 Victoria St, Dundas Nominators – Jennifer Powell-Fralick & Paul Fralick, Dundas

Slide 21

Flowering Tree Honourable Mention Magnolia Sydenham & Park St, Dundas Nominator – Michelle Chin, Dundas

Slide 22

Flowering Tree Honourable Mention Magnolia 25 Sanders Ave, Hamilton Nominator – Megan Coombes, Hamilton

Slide 23

Rare Tree Winner Chinquapin Oak Fisher’s Mill Park, King St. W., Dundas Nominator - Emil Sekerak, Burlington

Slide 24

Rare Tree Honourable Mention Kentucky Coffee tree 27 South St, Dundas Nominator – Mary Johnston, Dundas

Slide 25

Rare Tree Honourable Mention Cucumber tree 30 South St W, Dundas Nominator – Gary Finchman, Dundas

Slide 26

Historical Landmark Winner Bur Oak Dundas Driving Park Nominator – Susan Masterman, Dundas

Slide 27

Historical Landmark Honourable Mention Red Oak 253 Hwy 8, Betzner Farm, West Flamborough Nominators – Gary & Shirley Betzner

Slide 28

Distinct Form Winner Japanese Maple 1 Melville St, Dundas Nominators – Fred & Sharyn Hall, Dundas

Slide 29

Distinct Form Honourable Mention Osage Orange 47 Market St N, Dundas Nominators – Mark & Janice Jeffree, Dundas

Slide 30

Distinct Form Honourable Mention European Beeches 9 Victoria St, Dundas Nominator – Susan Masterman, Dundas

Slide 31

Group of Trees Winner Eastern White Cedars Escarpment edge, Borer’s Falls, Dundas Peak, Webster’s Falls, Dundas Nominator – Anne W. Parker, Dundas

Slide 32

Group of Trees Honourable Mention Black Locusts 21 Bonham Dr, Jerseyville Nominator – Paul Grimwood, Jerseyville

Slide 33

Trees of Note ...

Slide 34

Trees of Note Shagbark Hickory 786 Governor’s Rd, Dundas Bigtooth Aspen 30 Osler Dr, Dundas Black Oak  Grove Cemetery, Dundas 

Slide 35

Trees of Note Black Walnut 73 Victoria St, Dundas Tricolour Beech 155 Park St W, Dundas White Oak 44 Highway 8, Flamborough  

Slide 36

Trees of Note Gingko  11 Melville St, Dundas Redwoods 3 Kemp Dr, Dundas Red Oak  Christ Church, Flamborough

Slide 37

Trees of Note Silver Maple  4 Mayfair Ave, Dundas

Slide 38

Best Tree Overall Tulip 35 Cross St., Dundas Nominator – Kim Newcombe, Hamilton

Summary: Awards Celebration presentation October 2009

Tags: heritage trees dundas ontario

URL: