2014-November-Search-RCAN

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Slide 1

A TodaysMeet room was created as a backchannel.

Slide 2

The prayer is also on the bottom of the 3-2-1 sheet.

Slide 3

Get a list of all the attendees for the session – Interactive Fruit Machine – There are many things that can be done to engage students. The Interactive Fruit Machine can assist in students attending to the instructional activities in class. One way that teachers can increase the answers they receive from students is the use of wait time. By using a name picking tool, the teacher has the equivalent of popsicle sticks with names. Ask the question, wait three seconds and then click the Fruit Machine button. When the student answers, they can click the remove button to remove that student from the list and, after the teacher asks the next question, press the Fruit Machine button. Possible question to test the fruit machine: What might be some key skills for a second grade student in learning to read a web page? You can save the name list for future use. When it is saved it ends up as a file in your Download folder named fruit_machine.htm – the file can be renamed (e.g., fruit_machine5a.htm) for multiple classes.

Slide 4

We will still be using annoro.wikispaces.com

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The links will all be in the section labeled Research. The tiles are brown.

Slide 6

You will once again be looking to record three things you want to remember, two things you want to tell someone else and one thing you will do in the next 30 days to assist your faculty in understanding the power of having students practice their research skills throughout the day by modeling searches.

Slide 7

You had some time to think and reflect on our work in October. You wrote about it in the survey. Now we will take some time to talk together.

Slide 8

Remember our concept of learning being required. I want you to pause and think about the type of learning that could evolve in our classrooms if teachers got in the habit of turning the computer over to the student to search for answers on the Internet. Gary Price and Joyce Valenza via CyberSmart! https://vimeo.com/19707905 If a child knows how to find it and has a teacher guiding them they will be more successful. If teachers can help show who might have put information on the Internet and why they will grow in their knowledge over time. In the past the information was vetted by a book publisher and librarians chose the best. Now a child has to think about it and filter it. Tendency for students not to plan and think about what words and phrases are important and how to phrase it. Students settle for good enough when great stuff is out there. They may think the first page is good enough. How do we move what is from page 300 to page 1. You are not getting a link to an answer but a link to a possible answer. Principle of Least Effort – taking what you find and taking it as the best answer. Searching is planning – synonyms – key words – what is important and order of importance. Most important 1st. Nouns – phrase searching with quotes – Understand the scope of search tools available – www.ipl.org – Internet Public Library http://www.ipl.org/div/kidspace/ - Internet Public Library for Kids Subject directories – more limited field of search results (not dinosaurs but relationships of dinosaurs to birds – allow you to see how information is organized) Kidsclick.org (K-6) – organized by librarians and they select materials for quality, reading level, and relevance Teachers and librarians must educate students – first links or side links might be ADS. Databases – Every child ought to know about a full encyclopedia with good content and leads to quality websites – magazine and newspaper database aimed at the right level – radio and television transcripts that can be searched by keyword The ability to create lists for students can be helpful. http://trackstar.4teachers.org/ Stay away from a traditional tell me about the state of NY and change it to where would you rather live NY or PA and why. Winning baseball team, stores, weather in winter, restaurants, good bagels, crime statistics, Baltimore, New York City, Atlanta. Establish decision on criteria I deem important. Data collection, and analysis becomes meaningful. http://gws.ala.org/ - Great websites for kids Joycevalenza.com (The Neverending Search) Resourceshelf.freeprint.com The video: https://vimeo.com/19707905

Slide 9

Each time we gather we will continue to link our work with the ISTE standards. All month I have been linking to stories posted on Twitter and Facebook pages across the Archdiocese. If your school does not have Twitter or Facebook pages, please email a link to what is posted on the school website. In this way, we can see what is happening and ask each other questions. One of the big wins

Slide 10

When we work on the ISTE student standards, we will find that we are building on four of the six topics. It is certainly all about Research and Information Fluency as we: a. Plan strategies to guide inquiry b. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media c. Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks d. Process data and report results We have to use critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making skills as we: a. Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation b. Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project c. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions Within digital citizenship we: Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology There are also the technology operations and concepts surrounding using an Internet browser and understanding the technology behind the web

Slide 11

As a teacher we are meeting our standards because when we stop to have students answer their own questions with our guidance we are supporting the first standard by: #1 - Engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources The third standard by: #3 - Demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to new technologies and situations #3 - Model and facilitate effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support research and learning And the fourth standard by: #4 - Advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources

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We are going to examine several ways that you can assist the faculty and students in learning how to best find information that is age appropriate on the Internet.

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When we were at the county mapping day the teachers in the auditorium were learning something called Marzano high yield strategies. Robert Marzano is an educational researcher who takes educational research, combines the information into major studies of similar research, and analyzes the results. “Based on a survey of thousands of comparisons between experimental and control groups, using a wide variety of instructional strategies in K-12 classrooms of instructional strategies proven to improve student achievement” (Marzano, Robert J. A Handbook for Classroom Instruction That Works. Special ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall, 2005. 1. Print.) His group came up with 9 major strategies. One is called representing knowledge and one method of representing knowledge is known as nonlinguistic representation. It is a fancy word for making graphical pictures to help students process and understand what they are hearing and seeing. It could be a graphic organizer, a pictograph, a mental image, a physical model, or using the body to represent what they are learning. “So, students are commonly left to their own devices to generate nonlinguistic representations for new knowledge. However, when teachers help students in this endeavor, the effects on achievement are strong. Expelicitly engaging students in the creation of nonlinguistic representation actually stimulates and increases activity in the brain.” (Marzano, Robert J. A Handbook for Classroom Instruction That Works. Special ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall, 2005. 143. Print.) While we watch a video make notes on your conceptual diagram of how search works.

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This is a great video for teachers and students alike. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNHR6IQJGZs

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Another part of increasing our excellence in professional practice is through allocating time, resources, and access to ensure ongoing professional growth in technology fluency and integration. A not so simple task is learning to find resources online. I’m going to walk you through an exercise that you can share with your teachers to find more resources online. I’m going to use Google, but most of these exercises could be completed in other search engines. I am sharing the information I learned on a Bit by Bit podcast from the Christa McAuliffe conference in Maine back in 2007. What would you type if you wanted to find information about teaching the water cycle?

Slide 17

Average is the same as mean – add all the numbers and divide by how many there are in the list. Min – least amount of time Max – longest amount of time Mode – the number that came up most often Median – put the numbers in number order and choose the number in the middle

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Another of Marzano’s high yield strategies is the use of cues, questions, and advanced organizers. We are going to focus on one aspect of advanced organizers. It is said that “…advance organizers should focus on essential information, especially when unusual or bizarre aspects of a topic might distract students. Advance organizers can, of course, help students get ready to learn facts and details about a topic, but you can use advance organizers more effectively if you help students get ready to use the information.” One of the biggest ideas that we need to share with all teachers is that the Internet is a huge place that relies on students ability to skim and scan through pages using their reading skills. If a teacher appears at the computer lab or brings in a set of Internet ready devices into the classroom and tells the students find information about an insect they are doing their students a disservice. Children would really be better off looking at a picture dictionary or encyclopedia.

Slide 20

To begin building skills in first grade students, I created a simple cloze activity. A cloze activity removes a keyword from a sentence. It is an exercise in reading comprehension in the younger grades. To make the work easier for the students in the first grade, I created a short six question scavenger hunt. The students learned to navigate to the Little Explorer’s Picture Dictionary. Each clue tells the students which letter of the alphabet to search through. If I created a close activity for insects, I would first discuss what we knew about insects from science. I would then teach the students how to scroll up and down the page and look for pictures of insects. When they found one they had to compare my sentence to the one on the screen and accurately copy the missing word from the screen to the paper. Accurately copying down information is a skill too.

Slide 21

Before beginning the activity I took a photo of the classroom picture dictionary and showed them the lime page. We talked about fruit. Once they became familiar with the paper book we moved on to the Little Explorer’s Picture Dictionary and talked about the similarities and differences. Finally, they completed the five questions in the remaining class time. It makes them feel like “big kids” to be finding information on the Internet. We would do the first one together.

Slide 22

In comparing the website to the book, we look at the letters of the alphabet that you can click on at the top of the page. We review using the scroll bar to move through the pictures and words for the letter A. We scan and skim the A portion of the site for images of fruit and then stop and compare the words on my printout with the words on the screen. When a match is found, the students carefully copy the word. Spelling counts. When they finish, they bring the printout to me. If they find the wrong word or misspell it, they go back to the computer to try again. These are very basic skills. They also learn that if they click on a blue underlined word, by mistake, they must use the back button in the browser to go back to the previous page. This is the same thing as “turning the page” of a physical book except it knows which last page you were looking at.

Slide 23

The second grade does a more extensive cloze activity with birds and follows it up with learning to read further by choosing links.

Slide 24

These are a selection of the search terms that people used. Some things to think about when choosing search terms are: does order matter, do the words matter, what about words like of or the, what about the quotation marks…

Slide 25

The first step to teach students in any good search is to determine the question. I was pretty vague when I asked you to find out the benefits of electric cars. You could have simply used those words directly or thought of adjectives and synonyms to make a better question. We are going to see how we can find some information using Google.

Slide 26

Depending upon where you are searching and how your search settings are set you might get wildly different results from computer to computer and building to building. When I took this screen shot, it showed 54 million results. On another day in another building I got 91 million results.

Slide 27

Why do you think I had the bicycle and water at the bottom of the page. What might be buried in the 96 million results?

Slide 28

How do the quote marks help us? It tells the search engine to look for the exact phrase.

Slide 29

Going to Google’s Advanced Search lets you look for even more specific information. As a teacher I could try to determine what pre-made handouts might be avilable. You can click the gear in the upper right hand corner of a Google Search or go directly to the website.

Slide 30

What are PDF’s useful to search for?

Slide 31

We can find, potentially, better information by thinking about the top-level domain of the website. .com – commercial, anyone can register this type of domain, you have to think about the commercial intent .gov – United States government – more factual, trustworthy, must be a governmental agency to register this domain .mil – United States military – must be affiliated with the armed forces to register this domain .org – any organization – many non-profits, anyone can register this type of domain, NOT necessarily trustworthy .edu – United States higher education/university – must be a university to register this type of domain although there are some high schools and grammar schools grandfathered in before the decision was made to limit the domain, NOT necessarily trustworthy, make sure you are not looking at a student page (look for ~ or jdoe in URL) .es – Spain, .de – Germany, .ca – Canada, .mx – Mexico, .fr – France .k12.nj.us – a public school in New Jersey

Slide 32

Not necessarily a good example to share with students because of the content. Search for martin luther king – www.martinlutherking.org is a site sponsored by Stormfront. You can do www.who.is and type in a domain. If you Google Stormfront you will see they are not a good, unbiased group.

Slide 33

How do we rate the potential validity and bias of these sites?

Slide 34

When helping a Spanish teacher find a useful website for class you might find more interesting results with the .es or .mx domains. If you were studying World War II and want to give your students a different perspective you could search the German domain for WWII or the United Kingdom for “American revolution”.

Slide 35

I can even limit it a search for the water cycle to PDF files held at public school sites in NJ.

Slide 36

Some Shockwave Flash animations can be useful on interactive whiteboards.

Slide 37

You need a public library card number to access jerseyclicks.com in New Jersey. In New York, you may have to go to your local public library site. Always make sure that you are putting a check mark in Full Text or you will get results that you have to physically go to a library to get the resource.

Slide 38

Wolfram Alpha is a computational knowledge engine. It does not use spiders to search known web pages. It searches factual databases of information and provides you with text and visual representations of that information. Type your full date of birth: September 11, 1996 Type your first name Type 2x+3y=56 Type silver (as element; as color) orange (as a color) Type your state Type your town Type george washington

Slide 39

Joyce Valenza was a high school library information specialist in Pennsylvania. She was interviewed for the CyberSmart program and she talks about Pathfinders. What do you know about this concept? It helps teachers and librarians give their students quick links to accurate, age appropriate, unbiased information for school work.

Slide 40

The second and third grade students use a path finder to locate resources. They are continuing to build their scanning and skimming technique along with copying accurately by reading and transcribing words in relation to information about the United States.

Slide 41

Keep in mind that you do not have to teach every last thing we do in the workshop to every teacher. You know your school, your faculty, and your students. You may want to introduce different ideas to different groups. I must teach the technology integrators a variety of ideas in each workshop so that you can reflect on your building and share what makes the most sense in your environment.

Slide 1

Research and Information Fluency Ann Oro - oroann@rcan.org www.openclipart.org Credit for all clip art http://goo.gl/ssA3P3 Do Now Think Write Talk

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All: Holy Spirit, I thank You for the gift of technology. Right: Grant that I might teach those who use it with reverence - Left: ...as they long to understand; Right: With kindness – Left: ...as they struggle; Right: With hope - Left: ...in the promise of freedom that knowledge brings. All: May it help bring to fulfillment Your wonderful plan For each precious child You have called me to serve. I make this prayer to You in the name of Jesus, the Lord. Amen T. Cosentino Renfrew County CDSB, 2010

Slide 3

Interactive Fruit Machine http://www.classtools.net/main_area/template_loader.php/?fruit_machine

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http://annoro.wikispaces.com Integrating Technology in Education

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All links

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Your goal 3 2 1 https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreanna/2837855969 3 2 1

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Think – Write - Talk www.openclipart.org Think Write Talk

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/5762454084

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International Society for Technology in Education

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ISTE Standards Creativity and Innovation Communication and Collaboration Research and Information Fluency Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Digital Citizenship Technology Operations and Concepts Students

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ISTE Standards Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments Model Digital-Age Work and Learning Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership Teachers

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Model digital age work and learning

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Marzano High Yield Strategies – Nonlinguistic representation

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNHR6IQJGZs

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Modeling digital-age work and learning https://www.flickr.com/photos/complexify/3927056743 Creative Commons Attribution http://bobsprankle.com/bitbybit_wordpress/?p=312

Slide 16

Pre-Work 1 Each Sweet Search for Me (4me.sweetsearch.com) Ask Yahoo Great Websites for Kids (gws.ala.org) Internet Public Library (ipl.com) Kids Click Kids Search Mymunka.com Safesearchkids.com/google Searchypants.com Googlejunior.com Teachertube.com Findingdulcinea.com http://cs4hs.com/resources/cscs.html Primary Search Middle Search Plus Searchasaurus NoveList Google Scholar Note: Firefox and Google Chrome are browsers not search engines (mentioned twice)

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Pre-Work Average: 23 minutes Min: 5 minutes Max: 96 minutes Mode and Median: 15 minutes All pre-work reflected through 11/20/2014

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Pre-Work

Slide 19

https://www.flickr.com/photos/catnipstudio/4335046071 Creative Commons Attribution https://www.flickr.com/photos/sonorasam/8556740271 Creative Commons Attribution Marzano High Yield Strategies – Cues, questions, and advanced organizers

Slide 20

This insect begins with the letter F. The ____________(also known as the lightning bug) is a glowing, flying insect. Little Explorers Picture Dictionary – Cloze Activity http://www.enchantedlearning.com/Dictionary.html

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Little Explorers Picture Dictionary – Cloze Activity Scanned images of class book

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Little Explorers Picture Dictionary – Cloze Activity

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Little Explorers Picture Dictionary – Cloze Activity

Slide 24

Pre-Work Keywords electric cars benefits of electric cars electric car benefits electric cars benefits Phrase Searches “benefits of electric car for the environment” “benefits of electric cars for the environment” “benefits of electric cars on the environment” Synonyms electric cars environment kids environmental benefits of electric vehicles Alternate Keywords/Meanings fuel alternatives green vehicles

Slide 25

Determine your question https://www.flickr.com/photos/atmospheric-infrared-sounder/8265046380 Creative Commons Attribution

Slide 26

water cycle 95,700,000

Slide 27

Why? http://www.classtools.net/main_area/template_loader.php/?fruit_machine

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“water cycle” 4,030,000 3 2 1

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Advanced Search http://www.google.com/advanced_search 3 2 1

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PDF 369,000 3 2 1

Slide 31

Top-level domains Com (co.uk) Gov (gov.uk) Mil (mod.uk) Org (org.uk) Edu (ac.uk; sch.uk) es; de; ca; mx; fr k12.nj.us

Slide 32

Relevant, unbiased, accurate, age appropriate who.is

Slide 33

Pre-Work Eleantechnica.com Sierraclub.org Epa.gov Greenliving.lovetoknow.com Carsdirect.com Conserve-energy-future.com Sciencebuddies.org Usatoday.com Washingtonpost.com Teacherspayteachers.com Raz-kids.com Autotrader.com Mycoolelectriccar.com Berc.berkeley.edu Energyquest.ca.gov Dtpli.vic.gov.au Time.com Auto.howstuffworks.com EBSCO (4) NoveList (1) Searchasaurus (1)

Slide 34

Why .es or .de or .uk?

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k12.nj.us 491 3 2 1

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Shockwave Flash 1,200 3 2 1

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Search databases Local Library Card 3 2 1

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www.wolframalpha.com

Slide 39

Pathfinders https://vimeo.com/19707905 http://gws.ala.org/

Slide 40

Pathfinders

Slide 41

Information Overload https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MpfVD-c-QI

Summary: Exploring ISTE Teacher and Student Standard of information and research fluency.

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