April-May2015PublicWorkshopsFINALWebPageVersion

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Welcome public to grassroots effort—a once-in a generation opportunity to envision our future together Introduce self and co-chairs and Envision’s roll as neutral facilitator Personal story about why Envision Layton matters

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Layton dominates the taxable sales category (Farmington has 1/3 of what we do)

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Opportunity

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(5:05) In large group, introduce activities: introductions/what we love, conversation café, mapping activity, develop report out (5:15) Facilitators guide small groups through activities per facilitator guide 1. Sharing individual stories—as group members introduce themselves, they share what they love about Layton 2. Conversation café—groups engage in a discussion to identify what is great about Layton and what need to be preserved/enhanced for 2050, or a conversation about constants—what will be here in 2950 and what won’t 3. Mapping activity—to show where and how growth makes sense, to place anticipated housing and desired jobs/types of jobs in the city 4. Develop report out

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(5:05) In large group, introduce activities: introductions/what we love, conversation café, mapping activity, develop report out (5:15) Facilitators guide small groups through activities per facilitator guide 1. Sharing individual stories—as group members introduce themselves, they share what they love about Layton 2. Conversation café—groups engage in a discussion to identify what is great about Layton and what need to be preserved/enhanced for 2050, or a conversation about constants—what will be here in 2950 and what won’t 3. Mapping activity—to show where and how growth makes sense, to place anticipated housing and desired jobs/types of jobs in the city 4. Develop report out

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Thank people for brainstorming! Tell people that their ideas will be used to create a range of scenarios (snapshots of potential futures). They will find their ideas nested in the scenarios we will explore together next time. Based on public feedback on the alternative scenarios, we will work toward a vision for our city. Remind people to leave their contact info so they can continue to be involved

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Public Workshop Welcome!

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What do you envision? Envision Layton is a public, grassroots effort—a once-in a generation opportunity to envision our future together Co-chairs and Executive Committee introduced – explanation that Envision Utah’s roll is that of a neutral facilitator Co-chairs Kristin Elinkowski and Bruce Davis relate personal stories about why Envision Layton matters

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Why Do Visioning? To help the public and today’s decision makers understand the long-term consequences of the choices they make now.

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Envision Layton Executive Committee Kristin Elinkowski – Co-Chair Brett Nilsson, Planning Commission – Co-Chair Joyce Brown, City Council Preston Cox Bruce Davis Jewel Lee Kenley Robert J Stevenson, Mayor Joy Petro, City Council Dave Weaver, Planning Commission Spencer Young The Executive Committee is the governing body for Envision Layton; the Executive Committee operates under the auspices of the Layton City Council and Planning Commission.  The Executive Committee has the responsibility to oversee the day-to-day activities of Envision Layton and to be the spokespeople for the visioning effort.

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Envision Layton Stakeholder Group A Stuart Adams Daneen Adams Brent Allen B David Bailey Jamie Bateman Bryan Bayles Sara Beckstead Randy Benoit Brian Bodily Kathie Bone Mike Bouwhuis Dawn Brandvold C Preston Cox Amber Cypers D Chris Dallin Jay Dansie Bruce Davis Tom Day Nancy Dejong Daren Deru Barbara Dibble  E Kristen Elinkowski Sharon Esplin F Brian Fitzpatrick Dawn Fitzpatrick Jed Florence Jory Francis Scott Freitag Janene Fresques Norm Frost Pam Fullmer G Gabe Garn Gerald Gilbert Lyndia Graham Brandon Green Ed Green H Wynn Hansen Ben Hart Chad Harward Anne Hunsinger J Cory Jenkins   K Linda Kelley Chris Kimball Ron King Renny Knowlton Mike Kolendrianos L Mary Lamb Ron Layton Don Lever Krista Ligman Kris Long Scott Lunt M Marshall McKinnon Patrick McReaken Jim Morris Jeff Motta N Lynn Nestor Wes Nestor Bruce Nilson Brett Nilsson O Steven Oliver Ariel Osmond Mike Ostermiller Jeff Oyler P Hugh Parke David Paulsen Tim Pehrson John Petroff Jared Price Randy Pulham R Barbara Riddle Eric Roman Steve Rush Theresa Russell Brody Rypien S Bill Sanders Greg Sargent Craig Saxton Verdi Schill Luke Schroeder Patrick Scott Stan Searle Gibbs Smith Ron Stallworth Jake Stapp Sheryl Starkey Fred Stettler Jerry Stevenson Rich Stevenson Val Stratford Brady Stratton Bryan Stubbles T Clinton Tams Curtis Tanner U Tom Uriona V Robert Van Drunen Bill Van Dyke Derek Vance W Jarren Webb David Webster Jeff Whitesides L.T. Wiese Don Wilhelm Lance Wolfley Doug Wood Steve Woolley Gary Wright Y Jay Yahne Chris Young Z Sonia Zisumbo Envision Layton Stakeholder Group members were chosen by the Mayor and City Council to represent the different occupations, areas, and interests of Layton City.  Envision Layton Stakeholders therefore represent a large and diverse group of community leaders and citizens.  The Stakeholder Group ensures that a transparent and public process is preserved as Envision Layton explores the challenges and opportunities associated with growth.

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A Public Stakeholder Process 1. Provides research and information to the public 2. Seeks broad public input 3. Builds plans directly from public input 4. Uses transparent methods 5. Builds momentum for implementation

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The Premise The “public” has the right to choose its future—public officials should serve that vision. The “public” will make good choices if presented with real options.

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Scenario Approach Contrast today’s choices by showing long-term consequences

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“If you don’t know where you’re going, then any old road will do.” - Lewis Carroll Envision Layton is an opportunity for Layton residents to work together with decision makers to envision the future that builds upon the sound planning decisions of the past.

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Your voice, your project, your vision. We’re all in this together. This is a legacy we create for future generations. We’re going to grow. Why not identify and realize our vision?

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Types of Public Input . . . So far. www.envisionlayton.org Online Surveys Stakeholder Meetings Conversation Café’s Your Utah, Your Future Layton-specific Online Survey

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Remainder of Envision Layton Process 1. Public Workshops (Brainstorm) 2. Town Hall Meetings (Test: This, Not This) 3. Vision Summit (Consensus) 4. Implementation (Ready, Set, Action!) Now Summer/Fall Fall Ongoing

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Tasks for public workshop Identify general values and ideas about growth Explore where and how growth should unfold Activities: Survey Conversation café Mapping Sharing

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Keypad Polling Public workshop participants were each given a keypad to input answers to survey questions. Survey question results were provided live on the presentation screen.

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Source. Utah GOPB and Layton City Baseline Data How much have we grown? How much will we grow? 25,000 new residents 72,000 Conservative estimates indicate that Layton’s population at build-out will reach nearly 100,000 residents.

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How do housing needs change over a lifetime? Where have you lived at various stages of your life? How about your friends and family? What are their needs? The chart below illustrates the intersection of life cycles and housing preferences Workshop participants were asked to think about the following questions:

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How long do buildings last? Source: Arthur C. Nelson, Presidential Professor & Director of Metropolitan Research, University of Utah, based on DoE Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. This chart emphasizes that redevelopment opportunities arise much more frequently on aging commercial building sites than on residential sites, because of the much shorter average life spans of commercial buildings, particularly retail buildings.

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How many jobs per household do we provide? Source. Utah Dept. of Workforce Services and Layton Baseline Data …to make sure job opportunities are convenient and close by… This chart indicates the change in the balance of housing and jobs in Layton City from 1990 to 2050. Jobs and housing were equal in 2004 with a steady increase to a ratio of 1.30 in 2015. The long term trend is for a slight overall decrease by 2050 to a ratio of 1.20.

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Where are the jobs? Source. Utah Dept. of Workforce Services The geographic focus of jobs in Layton City is around the Layton Hills Mall area and along the Interstate 15 corridor.

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Where do we work? Source. Utah Dept. of Workforce Services 18,987 3,897 Commuting In LAYTON

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Lots of retail…our households benefit. …to provide residents with city services, libraries, parks, public safety… This chart indicates the change in amount of sales tax dollars Layton City collects on a per household basis from 1990 to 2015. The large jump from 1990 to 2000 is likely due to the large amount of new retail developments constructed in the city during this 10-year time period.

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Types of Jobs and Wages $22,000/year $36,000-40,000/year

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Share of Residential and Other Land Uses If current development trends continue, residential land uses will comprise the majority of new development over the next 35 years.

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We Use Remaining Residential Land If current residential development trends continue, the projected demand for residential land will exceed supply.

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Layton City

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Layton City - 2015 This map shows the amount of land that is currently developed.

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Layton City – 2050 Baseline? This map shows the amount of land that is currently developed and the land that is likely to develop by 2050 (red).

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Layton City – 2050 Baseline? This map shows the land that is likely to develop and how it is likely to develop by 2050 if current trends continue.

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What does growth mean for… Jobs? Housing affordability? Drive times and transportation options? Recreation and open space? Agricultural land? Housing needs and choice? Property taxes? Community identity?

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“If you don’t know where you’re going, then any old road will do.” - Lewis Carroll

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Summary of Survey Questions How important is it to you that Layton works toward the following goals? Scale: 1=Very unimportant, 2=Unimportant, 3=Important, 4=Very important Reasonably priced housing for our children and the workforce Reduced travel times Open space Job growth at existing employment centers Opportunities for walk/bike commutes Residential growth spread out across Layton Agriculture Reuse of underutilized land and buildings (infill and redevelopment) Convenient and reliable public transportation New employment centers Residential growth around commuter rail station Community identity A variety of housing choices A strong downtown Distinct neighborhoods providing convenient services Family-sustaining jobs Trail network Focusing growth at new highway interchanges

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Tasks for public workshop Identify general values and ideas about growth Explore where and how growth should unfold Activities: Survey Conversation café (facilitated) Mapping (facilitated) Sharing

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Conversation Café Think about what Layton might be like in 2050… As Layton grows and changes, what do we love about Layton that needs to be preserved or enhanced for future generations?

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Our Challenge: As we grow, what kind of a place to we want to create? 7,600 new households 6,500 new jobs different economy? affect on housing and jobs? Mapping: Create a picture of your ideal future (Input will shape alternative growth scenarios Open Space and Agricultural Land Growth and Place Making Transportation Exploring Growth Issues

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Open Space and Agricultural Land Which lands are important for future generations?

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Growth and Place-Making What kinds of places should be created? Where should people live and work?

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Mapping Exercise Participants were asked to identify preferred locations for growth Identify criteria for prime growth locations (centers?) Locate spaces for growth that fit your criteria Participants were asked to identify preferred growth patterns Place chips

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Growth - Housing

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Growth - Jobs

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Growth – Mixed Use

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Chip Placement The chips are to scale. The land they cover on the map is the land they cover on the ground. You can cover up current structures to indicate infill or redevelopment. You can trade chips. You can make your own chip. You can divide your chips. Challenge: accommodate homes and jobs in a pattern that you think is best for the future. 100 Lots 100 Acres 50 Lots 50 Acres

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Transportation How will people get around?

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Tasks for public porkshop Identify general values and ideas about growth Explore where and how growth should unfold Activities: Survey Conversation café Mapping Sharing

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Sharing Each group has 60 seconds to present results top 3 café ideas map: big ideas and priorities

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Public Workshop Thank you! Don’t forget - Instagram hashtags for Envision Layton: #envisionlayton & #iloveLayton

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