Hunter Training - Introduction to i-Scout Probes

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Slide 2

The underlying concept behind i-Scout probes is to break the system into manageable zones that are easier and quicker to troubleshoot. When there is a problem, instead of starting the troubleshooting process at the node, use data obtained from probes that are installed in the field – to enable you to start closer to the problem – saving time, money, and respond quicker to customers

Slide 4

Hunter with Xcor uses CPD as a marker to find the exact location of network impairment. i-Scout Probes give Hunter the added ability to now precisely locate zones that are the source of ingress. And with i-Scout Probes, CPD becomes even easier to pinpoint.

Slide 5

The graph was generated to illustrate the probe modulation. The areas between the upper and lower boundaries shows how the frequency response fluctuates (switches the .3dB modulation in and out). Note that the scale of this graph is 1/2dB per division as shown on the left side. If we displayed this on the 10dB per division scale it would almost look like a flat line. The probes also have very good return loss and high frequency response. We have seen no cases where the probe de-rated the return loss of the passive it was attached to such that the passive no longer makes its spec with the probe attached. This shows the modulation envelope of the Probe The modulation frequency is different for each Probe in a node - this defines the Probe ID. The location of where each probe is installed is stored in a database. When the return ingress or CPD signal is demodulated at the headend the probe ID is resolved – and software is used to find the installed location. Modulation frequency varies from ≈ 2 - 4Hz

Slide 6

Slide 7

When finding CPD, just go to the field and hook quiver up to the network upstream of the probe, get a reading and plug the reading into Quiver Navigator to find the exact source location. This is a huge time savings over how we normally do it – will probably take around 20 minutes for the whole process instead of the typical hour. If the i-Scout demodulation results point to both ingress and CPD as having the same ID – our recommendation is to always search for and fix the CPD first using the Hunter tools. Frequently, if you fix the CPD you will also fix the ingress. The devices on the map with a green circle are locations with i-Scout Probes installed. To the right, the green check mark indicates CPD candidates that located downstream of the selected probe – in this case the exact source of the problem. On the select node dropdown box at the top right, the check mark next to the node number means that probes are installed in that node. Again, one stop is likely all that will be required. Here simply go to TP103 that is flagged to fix the problem. If the source is CPD Use standard Hunter techniques, but instead of starting at the node with Quiver, start at the most convenient device upstream of the identified i-Scout Probe. The time distance to the impairment will be displayed Enter the time distance into the Quiver Navigator Candidate devices will be flagged

Slide 8

For ingress, when you find the ID – simply dispatch technicians to the zone, nothing more from our equipment is needed. Our equipment is not used to identify the actual ingress source that is downstream of the probe. It is up to the technician to use whatever ingress location techniques they would normally employ. What we do is get them to the zone, instead of have them start from the node – it’s a huge savings in the troubleshooting process. Information to find the Simply enter the node and probe ID information and a map is displayed that shows the highlighted location If the source is Ingress Hunter’s job is done – the zone has been identified Use status quo ingress location techniques starting from that location to find the source The maps shown are what is displayed in the client – similar maps would be found in the Quiver Navigator.

Slide 1

Hunter Training – Introduction to i-Scout Probes January 7, 2010

Slide 2

i-Scout probes, - the “Zone Management” concept

Slide 3

Using traditional hunt and peck techniques to go deeper into the network to find the source of ingress Potential number of stops required to find source 1 2 4 3 7 6 5 9 8 Total potential time to find one problem - 4:30

Slide 4

Theory - i-Scout Probes i-Scout Probes are permanently placed at strategic points within the network Each Probe imparts a slow .3dB AM modulation on frequencies <20MHz The modulation frequency of each Probe installed in the node is unique – it is effectively an ID code for each device Any impairment generated downstream of the Probe will be similarly modulated as it passes by the Probe location – if it is an ingress source it will be modulated, if it is a CPD source it will be modulated The number of Probes installed in each node can vary, but the maximum is 32

Slide 5

Theory Modulation frequency varies from ≈ 2 - 4Hz Return path ingress and CPD signals pick up this modulation as they pass by probe location The return signal is demodulated at the headend to determine the probe ID and therefore the location of the impairment

Slide 6

i-Scout implementation Hunter automatically scans for i-Scout Probes during certain periods of the day that you select – the demodulation process for scan takes two minutes so the selected time of day to do the scan is important (could slow users down if they are calibrating, using headend view, etc.) An example from the signal archive in Xcor Client is shown at right. The higher the bar the higher the confidence of the result

Slide 7

implementation

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