2015 October Workshop

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The handout is online in PDF and Word format in case you can use it or want to modify it.

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Prayer from back of handout.

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What questions do you have? I will pass them on to Barbara Dolan or answer them as best as I can.

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Prayer from back of handout.

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We may not be quite there within the schools, but last year was a time to get started. While we will continue to look at new ideas this year. You and the teachers and principal in the school will be busy with PowerSchool and Rubicon Atlas. I would really like you to continue to work with teachers on what we talked about last year. The idea is not to overwhelm anyone. The idea is to continue to take baby steps. I want to help reinforce your learning and give teachers a way to try out some of those tools. We worked with Plickers. It is a tool any teacher can use as long as they have one device that can access the Internet such as a iPad or an iOS phone or an Android phone. We really need to see teachers using tools like this for formative assessment. If every child has a device, teachers can be using Kahoot. Somewhere in the middle is Socrative. I shared Plickers and Socrative with the new principals. When I see all the principals I will use those again. It is such an easy technology. Let’s give it a try together.

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I was thinking about this statement on the drive to work yesterday. Sometimes I hear people say that working with technology is so different…it changes so often…it can be difficult some days…and so on. There is truth to this statement, but teachers deal with this everyday. You don’t know which student went to bed at 2am or ate 12 hours ago and is hungry and cranky, that you’re getting a new student in class right now and no one told you, or that a student’s family just moved out of town and you didn’t get to say good bye. Sometimes technology is cranky, sometimes it won’t cooperate, sometimes a tool is no longer free or goes bankrupt, sometimes you find a new tool you love.

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One of the most important parts of our six workshops is something you all chose as very important and that is networking time. We will continue to see how it evolves this year. These workshops are for you. By May of last year we decided that we would spend 10 minutes at the start of each workshop and 10 minutes at the end sharing questions to the group, or projects that we did with students, or anything else on your mind. The first thing I want to do is get everyone warmed up. We are going to do the Ultimate Rock Paper Scissors. Here are the rules. You will walk up to someone you don’t know or didn’t talk with much last year. Introduce yourself and have a quick rock, paper, scissors game. Just one round (not best of three). The winner makes a match against the winner of a pair nearby. The loser becomes your cheering team. It will be pretty quick. We will go until there is an ultimate winner. Let’s sit and take 10 minutes to share.

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The power of Yet – what can you not do…yet? I cannot publish a PK-12 Technology Curriculum Map…yet http://metaatem.net/words/ “Over the years, neuroscientists have explored the question of what made individuals like Beethoven great? What research shows is that individuals who are the elite in their careers get there because of deep and deliberate practice that is defined as: “Working on technique, seeking critical feedback, and focusing ruthlessly on shoring up weaknesses.” Moreover, those elite artists and innovators average about 10,000 hours of deliberate practice for “cognitively demanding activities that need significant thoughts.”” http://www.edutopia.org/discussion/power-yet When you share a tool with a teacher to assist student learning that first time won’t be enough. After a few tries they will become comfortable. After a year or two they will be secure. <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/49968232@N00/14649674278" id="fs_1" title="&quot;Brick letter y&quot;"><img border="0" alt="Brick letter y" title="Brick letter y" src="http://static.flickr.com/3853/14649674278_c8c2264f12_t.jpg"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/21450297@N06/3622267832" id="fs_2" title="&quot;E&quot;"><img border="0" alt="E" title="E" src="http://static.flickr.com/3634/3622267832_54f292ce59_t.jpg"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/49968232@N00/19008193808" id="fs_3" title="Word Grab letter T"><img alt="Word Grab letter T" border="0" src="http://static.flickr.com/528/19008193808_d3a501a7e9_t.jpg"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/11203907@N00/2221833635" id="fs_4" title="&quot;One&quot;"><img border="0" alt="One" title="One" src="http://static.flickr.com/2145/2221833635_610e1a0ac8_t.jpg"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/95229107@N00/33252144" id="fs_5" title="Fullstop"><img alt="Fullstop" border="0" src="http://static.flickr.com/22/33252144_446f9a74bd_t.jpg"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/92709190@N00/2429870360" id="fs_6" title="."><img alt="." border="0" src="http://static.flickr.com/3219/2429870360_a1c884d7e1_t.jpg"></a>

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I want to have you take a few minutes and write down each teachers name, grade, and content area. If you can think of something they did last year with you, put it in the last column. You may not have something new to share. You may want to have them really master what they did last year. You may want to target a group of teachers for something as a small group.

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Include your specials teachers too.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFzDaBzBlL0 “My thinking was in a rut. This bike revealed a very deep truth to me. I had the knowledge of how to ride the bike but I did not have the understanding. Knowledge IS NOT understanding.” “If you change one part – it effects the entire control system.” “Once you have rigid thinking in your head, you cannot change that, even if you want to.” “Five minutes of practice every day – many wrecks – the neighbors made fun of me – after 8 months…this happened.” “Any small distraction at all would interrupt the new pattern in his brain.” “In two weeks, his child did what it took him 8 months to do.” “Truth is truth…no matter what I think about it…be very careful with how you interpret things because you are looking at the world with a bias whether you think you are or not.”

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Does anyone need a remind about safeshare.tv? I shared it with new principals, the STEM group, new teachers, and teacher mentors in August and September.

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Does anyone need a remind about safeshare.tv? I shared it with new principals, the STEM group, new teachers, and teacher mentors in August and September.

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Think about having “your side of the bed” – it’s hard to sleep on the “wrong side”. When I asked you to try some new things last year, or even blogging this year, it was like sleeping on the wrong side of the bed. You may not have been used to using Edmodo or Diigo. Some of you slept on the wrong side of the bed when I made you; others tried it until it became more of a pattern. We have to keep trying new things and think about how we can be more efficient by using different tools to share and communicate, but more important think about how we can amplify student learning.

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I created this site specifically to help those who were not with us this past year to catch up on the learning. You can use it to review what we learned. The pre-work for December is to complete the Blogger if you have not done so yet, comment on someone’s blog that does not have a comment from someone other than me, and complete the Copyright Friendly Media unit by December 1.

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This extends to your first assignment of the year was to create a blog and begin commenting on other tech integration specialists’ posts. I do not expect you to start a blog with students this year, or encourage other teachers to try it. If you are already blogging, or are giving it a try already as something new this year…keep going. What I did was what a lot of teachers do with blogging. They start a blog and give everyone the same prompt or a set of prompts to choose from. It gives students a way to publish their thinking in an online space. If I had my own class, I would have started differently. I would have created posts and taught the students how to leave constructive feedback. When students are taught to comment on each others posts they are pushed to add meaning to the conversation. It is different from writing in a journal in that anyone can look at their work as long as they have access to the posts. Some teachers choose to keep the blogs private or within a closed group. It is a great way to start. It can be accomplished in a classroom with one computer and one Internet connection or with a one laptop per child configuration.

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There are many different ways that people blog. There are standard text blogs, there are image blogs, audio blog, and video blogs.

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Do you want a walled garden or authentic communication with a global audience on the Internet?

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The big question becomes…can I do this without getting frustrated and stay on top of what the everyone in the group of technology integration specialists is writing about and commenting on? How can I do it with students and keep on top of what they are doing? You absolutely can. RSS Readers help and I will show you that in a minute.

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Another question I heard was why would teachers have a blog? It allows you to keep a record of what you are doing online so that others can benefit from your learning and thinking. I am asking you to do it this year, and continue next year, for a number of reasons. In Edmodo, I am the only one to see people’s comments and reflections on assignments. The main Edmodo page is great for sharing questions and answers. I could have posted questions on Edmodo and had people reply, but just like students -- the answers tend to be brief. A blog lets you write in a longer format. It is a type of communication called Asynchronous. When you write, you might get someone to ask you a question and give you something else to think about. It’s not immediate like TodaysMeet or a Skype call. Later on, someone else might read the post and comments and add their thoughts.

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With Kidblog, you just see the new posts as they appear in chronological order. You click the Comments tab to read the comments and see what is new.

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Build literacy skills: when to use hyperlinks, images, online safety, build a positive digital footprint. Online learning. Commenting: Interactive, draw and connect kids together, (ClustrMaps), capitalization, excessive use of explanation marks, punctuation. What to write, content: give specific details, add information: give a specific compliment, add relevant information, make a connection, ask questions, proofread. First group commenting, then pair up, then both hands up gets teacher proofreading. Nobody publishes without teacher or other adult approval. Open another tab. Evaluation of comment: Use fingers for 1 or 2 point comment. 1 because all sentences start the same way or didn’t add anything new. 2=vocabulary, new information, asked a good question.

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HTML – high level vocab bolded – carpet comment

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HTML – important idea bolded – carpet comment

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They are asked to write as different individuals.

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Take five minutes and talk with one another about your experience. Did you not try it? Did you make your first blog post? Did you try and give up? What are your current thoughts?

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One of the best reflective posts.

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Comments

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Comments

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Comments – The point is to get to where you can have a conversation.

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I write for myself. I write so I don’t forget how and why I do things. I write so I can remember what I learned at different conferences. I never write about specific people and incidents. Those are for face-to-face conversations. When I began back in July of 2007, I never would have imagined I would write over 300 posts and have them viewed over 66,000 times.

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I love numbers, so it’s no surprise I keep statistics. Looking at the past month, my note about Sharing Gimp Lessons was viewed 24 times. My recap of a trip to the NJ and PA ECET2 convening was viewed 11 times. I figure if it helps someone else, it’s worth putting it online.

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Statcounter is a free website. It gives you code to embed in the website and it puts a cookie on the computer to keep track of visits. I do it for all the resource wikis I create in addition to blogs. My most popular content on the Internet is a wiki that I stored my lessons for K-8 computer class. It is closing in on a half a million hits. Close behind is a wiki I created with two teachers for Seton Hall and my Catholic School Leadership Masters followed by the blog.

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I also enjoy seeing where people visit from. I use ClustrMaps.com It starts out kind of sad, but over time you can see how far your words have spread. The bigger the dot the more people from that area read the blog.

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Deb Fagnan used Supercounters. It’s pretty neat that in a month she has had visitors from the US and Europe!

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RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication. It is like a pipeline out of a website that other websites can use. In the case of Feedly, you create a free account and then copy and paste web addresses for blogs into the feed reader. It is like one stop shopping. It doesn’t seem to work for Google+ or websites behind passwords like Kidblogs. It will help you with Blogger and Edublogs. I set up a Feedly account and copied and pasted in the blogs. Now once a day or once a week I can open Feedly and it will show me who has new posts and where there are new comments. This is how I used to keep up with wiki edits, too. I have a YouTube video that you can watch to learn how to set up your own Feedly account.

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With Kidblog, you just see the new posts as they appear in chronological order. You click the Comments tab to read the comments and see what is new.

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We worked as a group to look at the New Jersey Technology Standards, the ISTE Student Standards, and the Techworks program from Teacher Created Materials. From there everyone brainstormed the skills they believed students from PK-8 must have learned by the time they graduate 8th grade.

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Over the summer several teachers came to the Archdiocesan Center to divide the skills into three grade bands: PK-2; 3-5; and 6-8. These are now in the Rubicon Atlas system as our “standards”. The reason we listed them this way is to give everyone the ability to select items from the standards when they input their Unit Plans. We are extremely light in the communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity skills. We will work on those through the spring.

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In June, once we have our skills agreed upon, we will come together as a large group for two days. We will work in groups to break the skills down into “core maps”. These maps will move our skills from the RCAN standards to the skills section of the core map. We will align our skills to the NJ Technology Standards which themselves are based on the ISTE standards. The Gospel values are pretty much the same across the curriculums.

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When you are writing up your Unit Plans, make sure you are selecting from the RCAN Technology PK-2; 3-5; and 6-8 standards. It will make our job in June so much easier.

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If the students are not required to work in pairs or groups they are really not using communication skills. We need to move on to the next level for our skills for the Technology Curriculum map. You will need to define skills that require students to work in pairs or groups to complete technology tasks. Students are working together in pairs and groups when they are discussing an issue, solving a problem, or creating a product.

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They are working in level two when they are working in pairs or groups to give each other feedback, discuss an issue in a small group, use Skype to interview a student in another town, use shared OneNote or Google Docs to share story drafts and give each other feedback. In order to move to the next level of communication skills, they have to have shared responsibility.

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Shared responsibility is more than simply helping each other. Students must collaboratively own the work and be mutually responsible for its outcome. If the group work involves students or adults from outside the classroom, it only qualifies as shared responsibility IF the students and outside participants are mutually responsible for the outcome of the work. If students create a project using technology and each has responsibilities for the final outcome it is shared responsibility. If they give each other feedback but one student helps and the other student “owns” the work it is NOT shared responsibility. If students work with peers from across the country to create a joint website AND the students share responsibility for the development of the website it is shared responsibility. If they simply interview a peer from another country via Skype about the local weather, the worked together but did NOT have mutual responsibility for any particular outcome it is NOT shared responsibility. How could we move the NO’s to YES’s? They are sharing responsibility fairly when all students on a team are engaged in work, and all are contributing toward the final outcome. If the task gives students shared responsibility but in practice one student is doing all or most of the work, they are not sharing the responsibility fairly. So if a team of four students designs a website about an author and each of the students contributes text and visual related to a different book of an author they ARE sharing responsibility fairly. If two student do most of the work, the group of four is not working at level three and sharing fairly. If a small group of students use one tablet to complete an activity about diffusion and osmosis and each group completes one answer sheet AND all student contributed to the work it is sharing fairly. If small groups work together, but one student completes the sheet for the entire group WITHOUT all students contributing it is NOT sharing fairly. In order to move to the next level, the students need to make substantive decisions together.

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The students move up to level four in communication skills when they are working in pairs and group, have shared responsibility AND make substantive decisions together. They are making substantive decisions when they are shaping the content, process OR product where they have to actively resolve important issues that will guide their work. Content – students are using their knowledge of an issue to make a decision that affects the academic content of their work together such as taking a stance on a topic they will write about or deciding on a hypothesis. Process – students plan what to do, when to do it, what tools they will use, or the roles and responsibilities of people on the team. Product – students make fundamental design decisions that affect the nature and usability of their product. Students creating a video in which they decide who will direct, shoot, edit, what technology to use, and the timeline for getting the work done IS substantive decision making. Students following a teachers steps using one product with assigned roles and dates is NOT substantive decision making. Students ARE making substantive decisions when they interact with one another to jointly arrive at decisions. Students can be observed to be sharing ideas, listening to each other, negotiating and debating if they don’t agree initially. They are not making substantive decisions together if one student gives up and makes the decision, or they come to teacher to make the decision for the group. To move to the fifth level the work must be interdependent.

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If a work product is interdependent, ALL of the following must be true: The product shows evidence from all group members. Each contribution is essential to the final product. The work is integrated as a coherent whole.

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Media literacy: “the ability to understand, analyze, evaluate and create media messages in a wide variety of forms.” (Aufderheide & Firestone, 1993; Thoman, 2003). “Individuals, groups, and societies who can identify the most important problems, locate useful information the fastest, critically evaluate information most effectively, synthesize information most appropriately to develop the best solutions, and then communicate these solutions to others most clearly will succeed in the challenging times that await us.” (p. 5, Coiro, Knobel, Lankshear & Leu, 2011). Green, Seung, and Copeland (2014) have used a think-aloud protocol analysis to assess student digital literacy skills. speaking, listening, interviewing, revising, evaluating, and communication skills Student can record an audio file explaining tools they used Students can use ShowMe to give a demonstration (pre-write, edit, record as a presentation)

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What listening skills are required? What speaking skills are required? What contribution skills are required in typing into chat windows? Eye contact? Behavior when on camera? What do our avatars communicate about ourselves? What are the protocols and norms of computer-mediated communication? Do you send a text message before starting a Skype session?

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We did well with interpersonal communication skills in standing in front of an audience. (introduction, content, delivery, conclusion) and (presence, making eye contact, projecting voice, posture, and quality of message). Elevator pitch (voice, audience engagement, and pacing). Bedside Manner (peer review, portfolio review). What needs to be defined in distance learning or email? What is important in the construction of learning communities in an online course? In interactive learning opportunities? A comparison of face-to-face versus online communication? Responding in a timely manner; case, punctuation, and spelling? Reply All? BCC?

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We have covered this to a degree in Digital Citizenship. Does something about your various presence in games like Minecraft, or on Instagram, or Facebook and who you trust come under the communication heading? How does one develop a social presence for online discussions and what is the impact of your social presence?

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What is a document camera? It is a camera mounted on a support that connects to a computer to project images, like an overhead transparency, but they can be 3D objects and you can record videos and write on the images with digital ink.

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Schools who have document cameras

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Schools who have iPads

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What’s going on in this picture? It is a document camera displaying a crossword puzzle on the whiteboard. It is substitution. There is no functional improvement. You might say it is augmentation because the whole class can see what one student is doing. What level of communication is it? Level 1 – students are not required to work in pairs or groups. What might the learning purpose be? How could it be done in another way?

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Kids Showing Things https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ru3_gD9UCOo Origami https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzLZVh4BKhU

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Modification and redefinition based on an idea by Pete Dirindin, Black Forest Hills Elementary and Center for 21st Century Classrooms, 2013. http://www.d11.org/NextGen/Documents/Forms/AllItems.aspx SAMR template map.docx

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These were the original ideas.

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Remember, it takes 20 separate instances of practice to adopt a new skill. Don’t rush teachers along, but do see how they are doing with their new skills. Over time, they will adapt new ways of working for the benefit of students.

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Speed dating

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Year 2 Blogging, SAMR, and Communication Skills Ann Oro Director of K12 Instructional Technology for the Archdiocese of Newark Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial ShareAlike 2015 Images not cited are from openclipart.org

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Questions

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Get to know someone new today Image used with permission Ross Cooper

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NAILED IT TECH TOOLS ARE SUPPORTING STUDENT LEARNING “Success Kid” Photograph © Laney Griner / Used with Permission

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Hold up your card

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More than just “fun” – driving instruction

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Technology is like a class of students

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Technology can be discouraging

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Networking https://www.flickr.com/photos/133699554@N06/18641003234/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

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“Like Riding a Bike” http://safeshare.tv/w/IPvKWOLbMd

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Safeshare.tv

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Safeshare.tv

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Implications… "It takes a minimum of 20 separate instances of practice for a teacher to adopt a new skill for the classroom, according to researchers Bruce Joyce and Beverly Showers"

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2015-2016 RCAN Learns www.tinyurl.com/rcanlearns By 12/1/2015

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Image used with permission. © Karen McMillan http://www.notesfrommcteach.com/2010/09/learning-to-blog-using-paper.html

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/schtumple/13070539784 Ben K Adams Creative Commons 2014 Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasamarshall/14223027836 NASA Creative Commons 2014 Attribution-NonCommercial

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/mulmatsherm/2369801183 Creative Commons 2008 Attribution-ShareAlike

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/carlaarena/3119299028 Carla Arena Creative Commons 2008 Attribution-NonCommercial Lesson plans Seating arrangements Something they learned about Workshops/ Conferences Asynchronous Communication Why?

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Work in pairs – leave a comment http://www.tinyurl.com/rcanlearns

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What makes a good comment? http://www.tinyurl.com/rcanlearns

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What makes a good comment? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHkKVfpXRi4

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What makes a good comment? http://www.tinyurl.com/rcanlearns https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHkKVfpXRi4

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What makes a good comment? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHkKVfpXRi4

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What was your experience? https://www.flickr.com/photos/jayw/65723890 Jay Wilson 2005 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial

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Off to see the Wizard? As I work through the summer trying to balance family time with preparation for the up coming school year I have been looking at many blogs. If you have an interest, their is a "blog" for that. Some of my favorites are about home and hearth, many for profit. When we were asked to look at blogging as something we should do in our classrooms' however I became apprehensive. I am on no social media at all and am not used to sharing my thoughts in this forum but I am also up for and motivated by educational opportunities. So I began by reading and watching the video. I quickly felt overwhelmed and stopped(Cowardly Lion anyone?). It was a lot of information to process and since I was eventually being asked to evaluate the readings and video, I knew I had to watch and read each a few times (wasn't sure if I had a brain). The video and reading were helpful but they haven't quite got me on the road to the Emerald City. At times I feel like I am being attacked by flying monkeys (so much new stuff where do you begin). In this day and age where new technology is developed daily, I can't wish for home,(the time before we relied so heavily on technology in our daily lives) because it don't exist anymore. I thought the video was good because it offered a look at why a teacher see blogging as beneficial to classroom learning and the reading was like a check list for making your blog post something people want to "follow" (to use blogger language). Having students complete blog post as assignments will defiantly get them writing and thinking more and that is a big plus. The fact that others many see what you wrote may even motivate students to edit. I don't fully understand blogging (yet) but through collaboration we(my students and I) all may be able to ease on down the yellow brick road to a new understanding together. I was thinking to use it as apart of the technology class to evaluate projects and mark progress in student learning on an on going bases as well as a way to share learning with students' families. I don't think I am ready to "share" outside of the circle that is the RCAN group, and the school family (administrator, teachers, students and parents). http://wiredthought.blogspot.com/2015/08/off-to-see-wizard.html

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http://wiredthought.blogspot.com/2015/08/off-to-see-wizard.html

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http://wiredthought.blogspot.com/2015/08/off-to-see-wizard.html Joining the Blogosphere I had no idea how blogging could be used in a classroom but after watching the Linda Yollis video I could see its use. I especially liked her examples of the rainforest animals and historical figures. While poking around for more information regarding blogging, I discovered that Brainpop had 2 videos in regards to introducing students to blogging – one in Brainpop Jr for younger students and one in regular Brainpop for older students. I thought these would be good introductions to students for blogging. I also looked into Edublogs, “The World’s most popular education blogging service”, which gives many pointers for setting up blogs at Edublogs Teacher Challenge and a multitude of examples of teacher blogs that are already in use I can see the value of blogging however I do have concerns in regards to students having access to internet capable devices as we do not have a one device per child initiative as yet.

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https://kidblog.org/class/rcan-learns/posts/4bjwzsxkhd1abaqwlj6tcu85r

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Blogging 311 posts

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Blogging

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Statcounter.com

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ClustrMaps.com RCANLearns.Edublogs.org njtechteacher.blogspot.com

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Supercounters.com

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Feedly.com - RSS http://tinyurl.com/rcanfeedly

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Built-in to Kidblog http://tinyurl.com/rcanfeedly

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Curriculum Mapping

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The Process

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The Process

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The Process

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The Process

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Curriculum Mapping Communications Skills

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Communication Skills – Level 1 Are students required to work in pairs or groups? NO 1 YES Does not belong in Standards

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Communication Skills – Level 2 Students have shared responsibility? NO 2 YES Students are required to work in pairs or groups to complete a project utilizing technology. PK-2 3-5 6-8 Not every project

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Communication Skills – Level 3 Students make substantive decisions together? NO 3 YES Students are required to work in pairs or groups AND have shared responsibility to complete a project utilizing technology. PK-2 3-5 6-8

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Communication Skills – Level 4 Work product is interdependent? NO 4 YES 5 Students are required to work in pairs or groups AND have shared responsibility AND make substantive decisions together to complete a project utilizing technology. PK-2 3-5 6-8

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Work product is interdependent? Communication Skills – Level 5 5 PK-2 3-5 6-8 9-12 Students are required to work in pairs or groups AND have shared responsibility AND make substantive decisions together AND the product is interdependent.

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4Cs Research Series: What We Know About Communication Mass Communication

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4Cs Research Series: What We Know About Communication Computer-Mediated Communication

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4Cs Research Series: What We Know About Communication Interpersonal Communication https://www.flickr.com/photos/m-i-k-e/8695943397 Michael Kappel Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial https://www.flickr.com/photos/128733321@N05/18902844955 Michael Havens 2015 Creative Commons Attribution Ann Oro

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4Cs Research Series: What We Know About Communication Presence and Trust https://www.flickr.com/photos/uriel1998/9510925762 Steven Saus Creative Commons Attribution

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SAMR Technology Infusion Model

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Document Cameras https://www.flickr.com/photos/stanfordedtech/2091896108 Creative Commons EdTech Stanford University Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

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Document Cameras

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Substitutes

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SAMR Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition http://www.armoredpenguin.com/wordsearch/Data/2013.03/1817/18174047.619.html

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SAMR https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1z5F16mwAbBXtft0HyV4GPrD6jk8_CGZ0DQYxz4RkIzY/edit Attribution NonCommercial-ShareAlike Alice Keeler

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Students model communication in partner editing of a paragraph, record a video, and post online for critiquing. SAMR https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1z5F16mwAbBXtft0HyV4GPrD6jk8_CGZ0DQYxz4RkIzY/edit Attribution NonCommercial-ShareAlike Alice Keeler Students use annotation tools to trace veins in leaves or zoom in on details. Students model communication in partner editing of a paragraph.

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SAMR https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1z5F16mwAbBXtft0HyV4GPrD6jk8_CGZ0DQYxz4RkIzY/edit Attribution NonCommercial-ShareAlike Alice Keeler

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Would I rather… 20 separate instances of practice to adopt a new skill

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Networking

Summary: Major content: blogging and commenting, communication skills for student standards, and the SAMR model with document cameras.

Tags: 1516 rcantech

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