West Maui R2R Open House Nov.2015

0

No comments posted yet

Comments

Slide 1

PRESENTATION TOPICS West Maui Watershed Plan - Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watersheds Strategies and Implementation Report

Slide 2

It begins with Coral Reefs Home to many fish and other organisms Food and Culture Importance Tourism Buffer Shorelines from Wave action and Erosion Tourism Indicator of watershed health The amount of coral has decreased Condition of the coral reef is declining -

Slide 3

One causes of coral decline is poor water quality due to - Sediments which block light - Nutrients which cause algal growth and harm coral - Other contaminants which effects coral as well

Slide 4

West Maui is a US Coral Reef Task Force Priority Area The State recognized that an integrated and comprehensive approach to reduce land-based sources of pollution is one of the most important steps to help restore coral reef ecosystems multiple agencies and organizations to address adverse impacts to coral reefs in West Maui. The R2R Initiative pulls together many different efforts - of agencies, non-profits, citizens, landowners, etc. Working Group with West Maui representation

Slide 5

Planning process broken down in the two areas: -Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watersheds -Wahikuli & Honokōwai Watersheds Separate more detailed planning for the two areas that is then rolled up into the five watershed planning

Slide 6

Wahikuli-Honokōwai Watershed Management Plan (volumes I &II) were completed in 2012 and was sponsored by NOAA. Implementation of rain gardens in Wahikuli and Pohaku Beach Park and many other projects from the plan have been implemented. Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watershed Management Plan sponsored by DLNR & USACE – as is the West Maui Watershed Plan The West Maui Watershed Plan develops builds on information from the other plans and will develop a framework and selects a recommended strategy to reduce land-based pollutant and to restore coral reefs and protect the watershed.

Slide 8

The Characterization Report described conditions, land uses and potential pollutant sources. Building on the Characterization Report, the Strategies and Implementation Report guides actions to restore and protect water quality. it recommends actions and policies for different land uses in the watershed. It also identify data gaps needed to further implement the report.

Slide 9

For the three northern watersheds, no net diversions; the Honolua Intake returns the water downstream. These watersheds import water from Honokōhau watershed/stream USGS - Low Flow Characteristics for Streams in the Lahaina District (2014) flow data show most reaches are dry at least 50% of the time – rainfall dependent Honolua flows about less than 80% of the time. USGS Study was one of the first steps towards CWRM setting instream flow standards.

Slide 10

Preliminary findings of USGS (Geological Survey) field work in Ka'ōpala Gulch and Papua Gulch (part of Honolua Stream) are accumulations of sediments along the stream. When rainfalls, the stream waters rise and erode the accumulated sediments which are then carried out to the ocean.

Slide 11

Management measures need to be matched to stream conditions - stream slope, slope cross section, existing vegetation on cross slope, existing base flow (if any) and storm flows, accessibility for equipment, and stream drainage inputs and drainage size. Plants must be: Drought and moisture tolerant, Low Maintenance (self seeding), Easy to establish (time with rains) and ecologically appropriate (native to West Maui, and if not, are verified as non-invasive.) If you have thoughts or contacts, further study on ways to secure sediments is just beginning. Please let us know! More conversations and study to match appropriate on actions to address the stream terraces is needed.

Slide 12

Sediments have been addressed in the past with desilting basins and sediment basins. There are five existing desilting basins in Kahana watershed and some smaller sediment basins. Some basins need maintenance (Kahana, Nāpili 2-3) to improve capacity; retrofits may help to slow water and retain longer (especially fine sediments) Depending on ability to stop the accumulated instream sediments, the possibility of new desilting basins may need to be explored.

Slide 13

Ongoing Sources are access roads stream crossings and push piles (dirt pushed onto stream sides from road and field construction). Future sources are preventable sources! Wildfire prevention and mitigation Grazing – which can help prevent wildfire by reducing the fuel load Construction – needs education (developers, construction industry and County personnel) and enforcement

Slide 14

Urban areas have multiple pollutants - Sediments from construction, roadsides - Nutrients from golf courses and landscaping, cesspools and wastewater system - Hydrocarbons and heavy metals from vehicles - Other pollutants from wash waters - Large quantities of freshwater runoff

Slide 15

In addition to raingardens such as those in Wahikuli and Pohaku parks Filter strips for landscaped areas along coast, streams and gulches Roadside stabilization along stretches of Honoapi'ilani Highway Lower Road improvements for safety (slower cars, more space for pedestrians) and storm water treatment with vegetation – and improved aesthetics! Pervious pavement when repaving may be an option (sift out fine sediments to create spaces for water) Where no space, mechanical systems can settle out sediments and other pollutants.

Slide 16

Low Impact Development is a land development approach which aims to: manage and restore site hydrology, and natural and cultural resources by designing for infiltration, storage, and evaporation of storm water.

Slide 18

Everyone’s efforts are needed. In addition to the great things being done for the Kumuwai Campaign. Additional outreach is needed – storage and disposal of chemicals; landscaping practices

Slide 19

More water quality data needed to understand where focus should be and on which pollutants; have some data and data collection is underway by DOH; where should urban retrofits be focused? What is the drainage patterns? We need to be able to look up and down stream How effective are the existing desilting basins? Also in marine area gaps regarding coral locations, effects of pollutants and water circulation patterns

Slide 20

No single entity can single-handedly develop and implement a watershed plan. The efforts of government agencies, landowners, non-profits, residents, and visitors are all important components of successfully implementing a watershed plan conducive to a state of healthy coral reef ecosystems. Today starts with you – here are few opportunities to be involved.

Slide 1

West Maui Watershed Plan & Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watersheds Strategies and Implementation Report For November 18 2015 Open House

Slide 2

West Maui Coral Reefs Source: Hawai‘i State Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) compiled by NOAA

Slide 3

Land and Ocean are Connected

Slide 5

Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watersheds Wahikuli & Honokōwai Watersheds West Maui Watershed Plan

Slide 6

Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watershed Management Plan Watershed Characterization Vol 1 Strategies & Implementation Vol 2 Watershed Characterization Vol 1 Strategies & Implementation Vol 2 Wahikuli-Honokōwai Watershed Management Plan West Maui Watershed Plan For all 5 watersheds West Maui Watershed Plan

Slide 7

Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watersheds

Slide 8

Kahana, Honokahua & Honolua Watersheds Strategies & Implementation Report (Vol 2) Characterization Report (Vol 1)

Slide 9

Data from USGS - Low Flow Characteristics for Streams in the Lahaina District (2014) Stream Reaches

Slide 11

Mgmt Measures: Instream Sediments Bank Reshaping Boulder Clusters Lo‘i Kalo Native Grasses & Annuals Vetiver Grass

Slide 12

Mgmt Measure: Desilting Basins Maintenance Retrofits New Desilting Basins? Kahana Desilting Basin

Slide 13

Mgmt Measures: Ongoing / Future Sources Stream Crossing Stabilization “Push Piles” Wildfire Prevention & Mitigation

Slide 14

Urban / Development Sediments Nutrients & Pesticides Sediments, Runoff

Slide 15

Urban Retrofits Filter Strips Pervious Pavement Roadside Stabilization Biotreatment Less pavement

Slide 16

Urban Area Mix of stuff LID Low Impact Development

Slide 17

Potential Policy Measures Construction Storm Water Regulations Enforcement Ag / Conservation Best Management Practices Plans Water Quality Monitoring Storm Water Management Fee

Slide 18

Outreach: West Maui Kumuwai Campaign & More

Slide 19

Data Gaps Sediment Locations & Management Measures Water Quality Monitoring Desilting Basin Effectiveness Outfall Mapping/ Regional Drainage

Slide 20

Opportunities! Vision Be Informed Commit Volunteer Review Report

Slide 21

Next Steps Comments on Draft Report by Jan 8, 2016 Finalization of Kahana, Honokahua and Honolua Report in 2016 Work with landowners, partners & funders to implement plan projects & address data gaps Draft West Maui Watershed Plan in 2017

Slide 22

MAHALO

Summary: Presentation by Cami Kloster, Senior Planner, Group 70 International

URL:
More by this User
Most Viewed
Previous Page Next Page
This user hasn't uploaded any other presenations yet.
Previous Page Next Page