Effective PowerPoint Presenting

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ilknuruz (2 years ago)

PPT

teajoy (3 years ago)

love it

teajoy (3 years ago)

love it

BillyEverett (3 years ago)

I hate powerpoint presentations, but this is useful

nuxurious2002 (4 years ago)

user

nuxurious2002 (4 years ago)

user

oyeahardhi (4 years ago)

dddd

Arry (4 years ago)

Hi, Its really good and helpful..

Juliet_zhu (5 years ago)

Amazing, opened my mind!

twtsa (6 years ago)

USEFUL

Slide 1

Introductory slide to have on screen as people enter the room.

Slide 2

Start off on the wrong foot…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 3

Get them thinking this is just going to be another boring PowerPoint presentation…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 4

And then start over the right way. Hi. Improv good morning’s and thank you for letting me be here’s. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 5

Introduction of self – My name is Matthew Dyer. CLICK FOR PHOTO. I’ve got an HR Generalist background with undergraduate degrees in both HR Mgmt and Business Administration. At the recommendation of one of my college instructors, I applied for a gig with the state as a payroll specialist at ODJFS in 2005. Shortly after, I made the Ohio Housing Finance Agency my home for just under two years as a senior HR specialist. They honored me with the 2007 employee of the year award, so naturally I moved on before they thought better of it. CLICK FOR HALO. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 6

When an opportunity for a training program manager came up at DAS, I applied for it and the fates (along with the hiring manager) thought I might be able to add some value. So now I work here. CLICK FOR PHOTO. See? Right on the 29th floor with some other fabulous trainers that Jeff may or may not remember by now. Hopefully I actually will be able to add some value, before they think better of it. CLICK FOR HALO. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 7

Today I’m going to talk to you about PowerPoint… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 8

…which you may love… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 9

…or you may hate. In fact… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 10

…you probably love to hate it. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 11

What are your thoughts on the subject? How familiar are you with Powerpoint? Why do you like it? Why do you hate it? CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 12

Powerpoint can be confusing. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 13

Powerpoint can be boring. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 14

And when you put the two together, they can be downright smelly. CLICK FOR ANIMATION. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 15

But, believe it or not, they don’t have to be. CLICK FOR ANIMATION. The first thing I’d like to do is talk about what most people use powerpoint for…. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 16

…There are really three main things that you can do with powerpoint… You can use it to create a (CLICK) document, as a (CLICK) teleprompter, and for (CLICK) presentations. The format you decide to utilize depends on your purpose and your audience (CLICK FOR UNDERLINE). It depends on your intentions. Let’s talk briefly about the first two uses. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 17

You’ve probably seen people use powerpoint to introduce new polices or to instruct you on how to do something. You’ve all gotten the handouts with the lined sides that you take notes on, in effect turning the presentation into a a printed document. In some cases this is okay - powerpoint allows you to easily share screenshots for instructional purposes, and people tend to freak out if they don’t get the handout with the lines on the right hand side. After all, where else are you going to take notes? But there are a couple problems with using powerpoint to create documents. First, the material probably already exists somewhere else –in memo form, or procedure manual form, or some other type. Putting it to slide format doesn’t typically enhance the presentation experience. ASK - Why is that? ANSWERS MIGHT INCLUDE too much information to keep your attention, boring presenters, boring presentations, not being able to write and pay attention at the same time, small typeface, etc. CLICK FOR “NO” DOCUMENTS. There’s a trend now to stay away from using powerpoint as a document creation, for many of these reasons, and a few more we’ll talk about later. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 18

Using powerpoint as a teleprompter is also ok in some circumstances, but let’s get a show of hands here. How many of you have attended presentations where the leader of the discussion reads, word for excruciating word, exactly what is written on the slide? TURN BACK TO AUDIENCE AND READ THE SLIDE WORD FOR WORD. Hopefully you can see that using what’s on the screen for much more than jogging your memory about your speaking points causes your audience to disengage, and doesn’t help them remember what you were invited to share with them. CLICK FOR “NO” TELEPROMPTING. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 19

So I’m not going to show you how to create documents or teleprompting scripts with powerpoint today, CLICK FOR DOCUMENT & TELEPROMPT EXIT ANIMATION. Rather, my intentions are to show you how to use powerpoint to present effective presentations – how to use it for its intended purpose which is to present presentations. That is, I’m going to show you… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 20

…how to put power back into your powerpoint. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 22

So how do you put the power back into your presentations? I’m going to start by giving you 8-tips here today – 8 ways I’ve found that can potentially spruce up your next presentation. A lot of my presentation to you today will focus on design, but I’ll be sure to give you some tips on using the actual software effectively, as well as provide you with information on where to go to learn more. But for now, let’s focus on the 8-tips which I like to call… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 23

…Matthew’s Methods. Eight marvelous “methods” and tips that you can use to spruce up your next presentation. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 24

Let’s get started with the first method. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 25

Bullet points don’t kill people…they kill presentations. As is often the case with any kind of bullet, they may do more harm than good. Why? Let’s take a look at two very different presenters, with two very different presentation styles for some examples. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 26

Now I’m a Windows user, so I’m not necessarily disrespecting Mr Gates or his industry-crippling monopoly – after all, I’m just here to talk about presentations. But let’s take a look at this still from a presentation about Windows Live by Bill Gates. ASK: Does this look like a powerful, inspiring, and motivating presentation? Does it look informative? Why or why not? ASK: What do you think happens to the audience while Mr Gates is talking (or reading from the screen)? Where is your attention? Are you listening to what he’s saying, or are you reading the information on the screen behind him? Or are you trying to both whilst simultaneously writing furiously on the lined printouts he provided? The mind reads faster than one can speak, so if you were at this presentation, you’d have read the bullets behind Mr. Gates before he would’ve finished addressing the first key point. You know how to read, so you would’ve taken the information behind him, and your mind would have drawn its own conclusions, after which it would wander, wonder, and basically shut down. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 27

This brings me to the second helpful method I’ve found… Now, I never believed my mother when she told me, growing up, that “more is not always better.” I mean, really. Who did she think she was? If I like ice cream, I’m going to want more. If I like red crème soda, I’m going to drink the whole two liters in one setting…and later get sick all over the white carpet and never touch red crème soda again. Mom was right… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 28

…less is more. CLICK FOR ANIMATION. We’re constantly bombarded with information and noise, our minds are constantly active, and our attention spans are becoming shorter and shorter – meaning we retain less and less overall. So, the last thing you need when you’re presenting is any more distraction than necessary. When you’re using PowerPoint to make your point, keep it simple. One idea per slide is typically enough to make your point, and to help make sure it sticks –because there are less distractions, your audience will retain more of what you’re telling them. Has anyone heard of K.I.S.S.? Who can tell me what that means? CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 29

…that’s right. Keep it Short & Simple. This might be especially true when using graphics and clip art. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 30

Now I hate to keep comparing apples to oranges CLICK FOR ANIMATION but these two gentlemen make it kind of easy. On the left is Steve Jobs, at a product launch presentation for…apple computers. On the right, Mr. Gates has returned and is still talking about all the things Windows Live should be able to do. It’s really uncanny how different their two approaches are – ASK: What are the major differences you see? ANSWERS MAY INCLUDE: Jobs’ is simpler, more direct; Gates’ is full to the brim, almost chaotic and overloaded. You can see that Gates’ presentation is definitely busier than Jobs’, perhaps overwhelming the audience with visual and auditory information, whereas Jobs’ presentation is much simpler, cleaner, and direct. Gates’ clip art might be relevant, but it’s overused. The trend now is to stick with one major idea per slide, with one major graphic to help support it. Cliff Atkinson uses this concept in his well-known book Beyond Bullet Points. This brings me to my third method…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 31

CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 32

Don’t be afraid of white space…Why? Ellen Finklestein, the author of How to Do Everything with PowerPoint 2007 , and 101 Tips Every PowerPoint User Should Know says “Brighter LCD projectors mean that you don’t have to turn off the lights in most rooms. With the lights on, white isn’t as glaring as it used to be. Web sites usually use a white background and presentation design has followed this trend. A plain background enhances the effect of images, which may be overwhelmed by a fancy background.” CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 33

…or blue space, for that matter. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 34

…back to Steve Jobs and his presentation. Clearly he doesn’t let open space deter him. And the reason he does that is for focus – he knows that *he* is the presentation, and any slideshow is simply a supplement to his ideas – another medium for presenting them. Standing here on an empty stage not only adds drama to his presentation, it helps the audience to focus on what really matters – the message that he’s delivering, and the story that he’s telling. Coming out from behind the podium and interacting with his audience in front of a blank screen ensures the audience that he knows his material – thus building his credibility. He is the presentation, not his slideshow or his handouts. Jobs is a great presenter, and there are actually several more tips he can give you. Let’s watch him in action. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 36

Let’s talk about the fourth method. Does anyone have a box of tissues? Because we’re about to…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 37

…get emotional. I learned something about the science of learning and how the brain works at a recent conference. I don’t mean left brain/right brain concepts – although that’s important – but to demonstrate what I learned, follow me in the following exercise. This is the activity the speaker walked us through, and I’d like for you to try it with me now. Close your eyes. Seriously, just do it. Now picture a lemon, yellow and bright, in the palm of your hand. Imagine the texture of the lemon peel against your hand – it’s smooth, but you can feel the duvets, and you can feel the end coming to a blunt points where the stem was. Now imagine that you’re cutting the lemon in half. You notice that the lemon suddenly smells strong, fresh, and clean in your nostrils. You can feel the juice running down your hand, the seeds spilling out as you squeeze it. Reach it up to your mouth, and bite it. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 38

Did you pucker? Most likely you did (I hope so, otherwise you’ll just think I’m citrus happy). If you puckered, that’s your brain playing tricks on you – but it’s a pretty powerful sensation. In a nutshell, people remember more when there’s emotion or sensation involved. The brain latches on to the emotional hook, to the sensation, essentially combining the information you’re presenting with that emotion, making it “stick” better with your audience. That’s why training programs will often combine storytelling with instruction. The story and emotion gets the synapses in your mind firing rapidly, and helps information stick. Make your presentations, and your PowerPoints, include sensation, story, and the emotional hook for better retention. Your audience’s brains will thank you for it…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 39

…well, most of their brains. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 41

One of the design tips I’ve picked up recently is that inspiration is everywhere, you just have to notice it. Billboards are a great example of this – think about why. They’re designed to promote one idea, using a (usually) relevant image, and leave their audience with just enough information to stick.

Slide 42

Orange Barrel Media has some of my favorite examples of this locally.

Slide 43

Another example. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 44

Comics are also a great place to look for design inspiration - especially since the artist typically only has three panels to setup and deliver a punch-line. That’s not a lot of time or space to work with, but comic artists are masters at getting their point across quickly - so that it reaches our brains with just the right amount of information and timing to make us laugh. Can you imagine a comic that uses bullet points to convey ideas? CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 45

Hm.

Slide 46

One idea with enough visual impact to get the point across seems to work a lot better. Since we’re talking about making information stick in the quickest and most effective way possible, let’s move on to the next method…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 47

Method six…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 48

It’s okay to take shortcuts. And when I talk about shortcuts…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 49

I’m mostly referring to the handouts you have in front of you. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 50

Keyboard shortcuts that look a lot like these, and I’ve tried to include some that will be useful for you both when you’re designing your presentation, and when you’re actually presenting it. For example, if you’re in the middle of a presentation and want to remove the on-screen visual for just a moment, maybe to wake up that guy in the back (Jeff, is that you?), hit B or W for a black or white screen. Then just hit the B or W key again to resume your presentation. DEMONSTRATE. Forget to cover something? If you know what number the slide was that you forgot, simply type the number and press enter to go to that slide. If your keyboard is closeby, it’s a lot easier to do than try to fuss around with left and right clicks. This is where it’s often helpful to have your presenter notes coincide with your numbered slides. So let’s say I forgot to mention something on slide 45. I’ll type it, and we’ll zip back to Garfield. When I want to come back, I can just type 50 and hit enter. DEMONSTRATE. See? There are a ton of simple tricks like this that can make you look like a PowerPoint Pro – and most of them are available right within PowerPoint’s help file. If you can’t find something you need, try Google (or maybe even ask a librarian?). By using keyboard shortcuts as you design and present…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 51

…you’ll save yourself, and your audience, precious time. Don’t limit yourself to just keyboard shortcuts as a means to save time. PowerPoint allows you to customize color schemes, master slide layouts, and animation effects, which can all be time savers. This leads me to our 7th method… CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 52

Which has to do with using animations sparingly. Animations are a great way to create motion and continue ideas…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 53

…and like the rest of your slides, to help you tell your story. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 54

…but don’t over do it. Remember, unless you’re talking about chocolate, more is not always better, less is more, and Keep it Short & Simple - the same rule applies for animations and sound effects. CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 55

Fancy text animations and sounds are ways to get your audience’s attention, but over doing it can become more of a distraction than an asset to your presentation. If you’ve been following some of these methods, I’m hopeful you won’t need to rely on animations or sounds to maintain your audience’s attention.

Slide 56

All this is leading up to my eighth method…CLICK TO ADVANCE.

Slide 57

…trash the default. CLICK FOR ANIMATION PowerPoint allows you to do so much more than list bullet points on a screen. It can be a useful tool to engage your audience and help you tell your story. Tap into your creativity, notice inspiration….CLICK TO ADVANCE

Slide 58

…try starting your next PowerPoint presentation without utilizing a pre-formatted template; start with a blank canvas.

Slide 59

Read!

Slide 60

Cliff Atkinson’s Beyond Bullet Points is a great place to start. Cliff gives great examples of using headlines to present, wrapping your presentation within “acts” (like a play) to help convey information, and even offers design tips. I’ve listed a few other resources on the front of your handouts that you can check out when you have time. I highly recommend the Creating Powerful Presentations with Nancy Duarte link - Nancy is the presentation brains behind Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth”. She is releasing her book, slide:ology, in September.

Slide 61

and practice using some of the more advanced features in PowerPoint, as well as practicing your presentation. One of the quickest ways to build confidence is to know your material. (SHARE PICKLE STORY).

Slide 62

So what have we learned?

Slide 74

Thank you, hope this has been helpful, what questions do you have, etc.

Slide 1

this is powerpoint.

Slide 2

Presenting Presentations A Presentation About Using Microsoft PowerPoint by Matthew Dyer who is from the Department of Administrative Services, Office of Training & Development

Slide 3

Introduction Good morning and thank you for letting me be here. Today I’m going to talk to you about using Microsoft PowerPoint. I’ll give you 8 tips that I’ve collected which are helpful for me, and might be just as helpful for you.

Slide 4

Hi.

Slide 5

my name is matthew dyer.

Slide 6

i work here.

Slide 7

this is powerpoint.

Slide 8

you may love it.

Slide 9

you may hate it.

Slide 10

you may love to hate it.

Slide 11

why?

Slide 12

powerpoint can be confusing.

Slide 13

presentations can be boring.

Slide 14

powerpoint presentations can stink.

Slide 15

this is powerpoint. (it doesn’t have to stink.)

Slide 16

intentions. .

Slide 17

document creation.

Slide 18

How many of you have attended presentations where the leader of the discussion reads, word for excruciating word, exactly what is written on the slide? How many of you found this to be stimulating? How many of you found this to stretch your thinking and hold your attention span? How many of you would rather eat dry, three-day old toast? teleprompting.

Slide 19

intentions. . presentations.

Slide 20

(put the power back in powerpoint.)

Slide 21

(put the power back in powerpoint.)

Slide 22

how?

Slide 23

matthew’s methods.

Slide 24

method one

Slide 25

bullet points kill presentations.

Slide 26

how effective is this presentation?

Slide 27

method two

Slide 29

Keep It Short & Simple.

Slide 31

method three

Slide 32

don’t be afraid of white space.

Slide 33

…or blue space.

Slide 34

how effective is this presentation?

Slide 36

method four

Slide 37

get emotional.

Slide 38

make ‘em pucker.

Slide 39

(it usually works.)

Slide 40

method five

Slide 41

inspiration is everywhere.

Slide 45

Reasons Garfield Hates Mondays They start with “M”. They aren’t Fridays. They sneak up on you. They have a bad reputation. They crush the human spirit. They crush the feline spirit. They don’t crush the canines.

Slide 47

method six

Slide 48

it’s okay to take shortcuts.

Slide 49

your has some listed.

Slide 50

they look a bit like this,

Slide 51

and can save you some of this.

Slide 52

method seven

Slide 53

animations create motion & continue ideas.

Slide 54

don’t overdo it.

Slide 55

Introduction Good morning and thank you for letting me be here. Today I’m going to talk to you about using Microsoft PowerPoint. I’ll give you 8 tips that I’ve collected which are helpful for me, and might be just as helpful for you.

Slide 56

method eight

Slide 57

trash the default. Method 1 Method 2 Method 3 Method 4 Method 5 Method 6 Method 7 Method 8

Slide 58

start with a blank canvas.

Slide 59

read.

Slide 60

(a great place to start.)

Slide 61

practice.

Slide 62

?

Slide 63

matthew’s methods.

Slide 72

8 ways to keep this

Slide 73

from turning into this.

Slide 74

this was powerpoint.

Summary: I adapted much of this from Nancy Duarte's approach and philosophy on PowerPoint - with some Matthew flair thrown in. Please check her out - Slide:ology is her book, and it's just fantastic.

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