VisionSummitFINAL

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Slide 1

Welcome everyone Introduce self Express why you, personally, are excited to be here (tell a story) Ask how many have been involved or followed Envision Layton (show of hands) For those of you who are new to the effort…

Slide 2

Envision Layton is a grassroots effort, a public process—a once-in a generation opportunity for citizens to envision our future together. It has been an 18 month process in which we’ve looked out several decades (imagine Layton in 2050!), toward the future that we want to ensure exists…

Slide 3

…for our children and grandchildren. What we do today matters greatly for those who come after us. Our planning now enables us to be proactive together, to make good decisions now that will create the best future for those who come after us.

Slide 4

Envision Layton has been directed by an executive committee of community leaders in their own right.

Slide 5

And supported by a large group of stakeholders who have advised us all along the way. These respected citizens have made sure that what we heard from the public, the hundreds of citizens involved in this effort, is reflected in the vision that we will share and celebrate tonight. If you are on the executive committee or a member of the stakeholder group, would you please stand? (applause) Thank you for your service to your fellow citizens of Layton. And now I’d like to introduce Christie Oostema, who facilitated this project for us on behalf of Envision Utah.

Slide 6

Thank you, mayor, and all of you…you have been the heart of this process. What exactly has the process been? Well, Envision Layton is a stakeholder process, one in which your city and Envision Utah provided research and information to the public. We sought broad public input all along the way. And we built plans directly from that input. We used transparent methods throughout, so our citizens could see at any time how the process was progressing, and so we could hear and incorporate ideas. As you review exhibits this evening, you’ll see the nexus between what community members said and the vision that came out of the process. Finally, we believe this process, because it is transparent and collaborative, builds momentum for implementation, and we all can have a roll to play here as we realize our vision.

Slide 7

So, the basic premise of the process is this (read slide) This process is about your voice, your project, and your vision. We’re all in this together—this is a legacy we create for future generations. We’re going to grow. Why not identify and realize our vision for that growth?

Slide 8

I’ve explained that this is a stakeholder process. Well it’s also a scenario-based process. We built a range of potential futures based on your ideas. We then compared each of those “futures” or scenarios, to better understand the long-term consequences of the choices we could make today.

Slide 9

This is important. If we don’t know where we’re going, then any old road will do. Certainly we don’t want to leave the future of our city to chance.

Slide 10

The process was this. We got together last spring and summer in brainstorming workshops to identify our collective hopes for the future and to generate ideas about what our city should become in the next few decades. Then the stakeholder committee poured over these ideas and helped create several scenarios that explored several potential futures. We took these scenarios back to the public for feedback last fall and this winter, to see which ideas resonated with our citizens, and that led to the eventual creation of our vision.

Slide 11

What did we learn along the way? Well, we’ve grown a lot in the last few decades (you all know that!)—but while we’ve already seen the majority of our growth, we are still likely to welcome at least 23,000 new residents by 2050.

Slide 12

We thought together about likely housing needs, and how our housing needs tend to change over a lifetime. Where I lived when I first graduated from college for instance, is not where I live now. How can we provide needed options within our city, so our kids can choose to stay if they’d like?

Slide 13

We talked about where the jobs are—currently mostly along the I-15 corridor and by the base.

Slide 14

And some of us—about 4,000—both live and work in Layton. We see lots of people commuting in and lots commuting out.

Slide 15

And we saw what kind of jobs we have in our community, noting, I think, the need to ensure that we have strong retail services, but also that we have the jobs that sustain families.

Slide 16

We talked about the shelf life of buildings. Note that housing lasts a long time, so where we choose to put it matters a lot—it will be with us for a century or more—once we build a subdivision on our farmland, it’s gone. Other kinds of buildings—especially retail buildings—we tend to see turn over a few times over our lifetimes. We noted that these are the places right now that tend to be ripe for change, for imagining a different future.

Slide 17

As I said, hundreds of citizens were involved in this conversation, whether at workshops, town hall meetings, or via online surveys. This process was citywide, open to everyone.

Slide 18

Early in the process we worked from citizen feedback to establish quality of life goals for the effort. (read all) We kept these in mind as we continued to work together.

Slide 19

Here are some pictures from our workshops—you can see people creating and sharing maps of their ideal future—what they imagine Layton could become as it grows.

Slide 20

We used these maps as a basis for scenario development—the scenarios explore HOW we should grow (read questions)

Slide 21

With one exception: rather than working from public input we did develop one scenario that simply reflected trend—how we would grow if we simply continued business as usual. I’m not going to spend much time on these tonight, but you can review the exhibits if you want to study them more. In this scenario we use most of our remaining open land for suburban-style housing, leaving just a little land for future job growth, open space or agriculture.

Slide 22

And now the scenarios developed from your ideas. This one we call nearby neighborhoods—the city develops into a collection of distinct neighborhoods, each with a unique variety of housing, employment, cultural opportunities, recreation and services. Growth is focused in several smaller neighborhood centers, which are the focal point of community life—gathering places with churches, schools, services, and activities.

Slide 23

In this scenario—Urban Centers, Rural Edges—Layton draws a strong distinction between what is urban and what is rural, with new urban districts featuring regional attractions, commercial hubs, and more compact neighborhoods with a variety of housing options and services. Significant farmland remains in rural areas. Community life is most vibrant in urban districts, where most opportunities for working, shopping, learning and recreation exist.

Slide 24

In in this last scenario—Regional Centers—we emphasize that Layton expands its regional job and retail centers and maintains a strong physical distinction between these areas and its residential areas. Layton is a regional hub for jobs and shopping.

Slide 25

Layton citizens studied these scenarios and compared them. They could explore questions like: What kind of jobs will be here? How much will someone have to make in order to buy a house? Will I be able to walk to the things I need each day? How easy will it be to get around?

Slide 26

Citizens were able to select components of scenarios that resonated with their hopes for the future—kind of like selecting ingredients to make a meal…

Slide 27

And they expressed their preferences in questionnaires and online surveys. And you’ll see elements from all of the scenarios in the vision.

Slide 28

What did we learn? Well we learned a lot about components of the various scenarios that people liked. We also got a sense for the scenarios that most people preferred overall. You can see that scenarios B (nearby neighborhoods) and C (urban centers, rural edges) were those people were generally most excited about and supportive of.

Slide 29

Throughout the process, several “big ideas” kept coming up, and they were strong again in this round. We asked you which of these ideas were your top pick, and you can see that agricultural conservation--preserving rural feeling and function, was tops for 21% of you.

Slide 30

For many of you, agricultural land is not viewed as a holding zone for future development.

Slide 31

Two complementary ideas—mixing uses and redevelopment and infill—are a top pick of more than half of you

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Mixed use development is blending compatible civic, commercial, and residential functions so that destinations are closer, making it easier to access what people need each day.

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That’s similar to how we used to grow our communities, but different from the past several decades, where we’ve tended to lump all of our commercial into very large pads, as in the photo above…

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And keep residential areas very separate.

Slide 35

There is strong interest in bringing back some historic patterns, where streets like this are close to

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Neighborhoods like this.

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And, interestingly, this kind of thing often works in those places that are ripe for redevelopment and infill.

Slide 38

(Read stat) A focus on family-sustaining jobs…

Slide 39

Came up throughout this process—the need to balance wages and the cost of living in Layton, the need to grow the economy to match the skills, education and interest of residents.

Slide 40

And finally, parks and trails are important to residents. Read stat

Slide 41

We heard many conversations about taking advantage of our location between the mountains and the lake and what that could mean for recreation.

Slide 42

So, in this process, you Envisioned Layton! This is your voice, your vision, your Layton. This is what we will work toward together.

Slide 43

Here is our vision: (read slowly and then continue to the next page)

Slide 44

(read)

Slide 45

(read) This is so exciting and such an optimistic view of our city in the coming decades. This captures so much of what makes Layton great. A number of principles support this vision. Here they are…

Slide 46

We have three principles regarding neighborhoods and housing Principle 1 (read) Let’s support the existing network of neighborhoods…

Slide 47

…and strengthen them by bringing neighborhood services and amenities closer to home through redevelopment of underused land.

Slide 48

Principle 2 (read) Let’s permanently protect agricultural heritage, history and small farming operations by weaving them into the fabric of developing neighborhoods.

Slide 49

In this example you see that a new neighborhood has developed with a rural feel, and that farmland is preserved as a part of this development.

Slide 50

Zoomed out a bit you can see this neighborhood with a rather rural town feel that’s blended right into working lands.

Slide 51

We are a city of contrasts—a place for a rural feel…. but we are also a regional city. We embrace our urban identity, with a range of places to live for people in all stages of life. As in this example, let’s provide a wide range of housing options in new neighborhoods, neighborhood centers and urban districts with place-appropriate amenities and services, so that residents can comfortably live their entire lives in Layton.

Slide 52

Principles 4-8 focus on our economy. (read) Let’s take advantage of opportunities for existing and new urban districts and mixed use centers where we are most connected to our region and to national and global enterprises—near Salt Lake International Airport, commuter rail, the I-15 corridor, and Hill Airforce Base. This example is from Salt Lake City—like them we have tremendous opportunity at our Front Runner station.

Slide 53

And we’re already working on this—you recognize our own home grown case study—Kay’s Crossing.

Slide 54

And just off of I-15, ideas for redevelopment of the mall area are being discussed. University Place in Orem illustrates the kinds of things we could contemplate…places not only to shop but also to work, live and play.

Slide 55

Principle 5 (read) Let’s support existing industry clusters of hospitality (you can see our conference center in the photo), recreation and tourism, military, manufacturing, agriculture, trade and logistics. Promote and expand these existing industry clusters to provide a diverse range of job opportunities for family sustaining jobs and people of varying skills, education and interests. Let’s create new industry clusters to diversify the job base for increased economic stability and opportunity.

Slide 56

Principle 6 (read) Take a look at this visualization of the intersection of Gordon and Fairfield (looking north from the west side of Fairfield Road)—imagine what we could see… Let’s invest in underused land and buildings to realize new urban centers with family-sustaining jobs and housing to keep and attract a gifted workforce. Secure and improve space for new and expanded job centers near existing business and industry. We have the space to do this!

Slide 57

We can reimagine our downtown as in this sketch…

Slide 58

Or our Main Street/triangle area

Slide 59

Principle 7 (read) Let’s provide a wide range of housing choices and high quality healthcare, recreation, education and employment opportunities so that residents can live, learn and work in Layton in every stage of life. You’ve seen examples of that in other slides.

Slide 60

Principle 8 (read) Let’s invest in keystone projects and programs to meet quality of life goals and address the needs of Layton residents and businesses. Carefully plan for long term sustainability and maintain an affordable city in which to live and work. This is how we do business today, and how we need to continue.

Slide 61

Now we turn toward principles covering recreation, culture, open space and agriculture. Principle 9 (read) Let’s create a robust citywide parks and trails system that makes the most of our unique location. Complete a creek side trail system that links the mountains to the lake and beyond. Build awareness of proximity to ski resorts, urban fisheries, Antelope Island, Bonneville Shoreline Trail, and other recreational amenities.

Slide 62

And closely related—principle 10 (read) Let’s craft local systems of trails and pathways that make it comfortable for people to easily walk to parks, plazas and open space, to neighborhood destinations like schools and shopping, and to other nearby neighborhoods.

Slide 63

Shifting to agriculture—Principle 11 (read) As we further develop the city, preserve agricultural heritage sites and working farmland. We talked about future developments blending preserved farmland, heritage sites and neighborhoods—kind of like a golf course development but with working lands instead of a golf course.

Slide 64

And culture—principle 12 (read) Let’s cultivate cultural and educational amenities with a regional draw. In vibrant urban districts, actively encourage university expansion, performing arts, regional and professional sports, and hospitality. Imagine minor league sports? Or a professional arts organization? Or, see the photo of our Weber State campus? How about the ability to learn exactly what you need to advance your career, right here in our city?

Slide 65

Finally—what about how we get around? Principle 13 (read) In urban districts and neighborhoods centers, let’s focus on creating opportunities for walking, biking and taking public transportation to move between local destinations and out to other regional destinations. Let’s improve driving conditions in suburban areas by bringing daily destinations closer to home and improving existing roadways. Create opportunities for walking and biking there, by enhancing systems of trails and pathways, and improving the ability to access the public transportation network.

Slide 66

And principle 14 (read) Let’s build awareness of our easy access to local mountains and their opportunities for skiing, camping and enjoying the great outdoors as well as tourism opportunities inherent to living nearby a major airport. Illustrate our transportation connections that make industry and business enterprises uniquely simple: I-15, I- 84, the West Davis Corridor, industrial rail, commuter rail, and nearby Salt Lake International Airport. Clearly, we have access to our region, our state, and the world. This is important to our future. So, that’s our vision and the principles that support it. We’re so excited about them, and we’re grateful for all of you who have helped articulate this path forward.

Slide 67

In addition, we’ve create a vision map—this is not a zoning map, but rather one plausible way the vision and its principles could be realized on the ground. And it does help show some of the things that could be considered as we move ahead with a general plan and other updates. Take time tonight to study this exhibit (point to poster).

Slide 68

Another interesting thing we could do with the vision map, or scenario, is compare it with the others…

Slide 69

14% of land remains undeveloped, with open space or agricultural preservation possible, that’s vs. 9% in the trend scenario Layton continues to remain a city with a majority of single family homes (58%), but diversity increases to better accommodate younger people, older people, and others who need or desire a wider range of options. New housing is certainly more diverse than what exists today, yet more than 2/3 of that new growth is expected to be owner occupied. We’ll have more new professional/office jobs; we’ll still have a strong retail sector, but family sustaining jobs are the emphasis here The average wage is $39,815 in vision, slightly more than the $38,909 in the trend scenario Even more interesting, notice that the household income needed to afford a new home is $63,133 in vision scenario versus $105, 778 in trend scenario So in the trend scenario, even with two people per household working, new housing is unaffordable; in the vision scenario, it’s likely that a household could cover a mortgage on a new house with one person working full time and one working part time And a few numbers about transportation. Miles of new roads: 37 in vision, 54 in trend Miles driven per household: 19 (vision), 25 (trend) Miles of bike lanes/trails: 28 (vision), 8.9 miles (trend) Overall, I think we have a theme here: diversity—in land uses, in places to live, in ways to get around. And now I’ll turn the time back over to our mayor.

Slide 70

It’s our hope that you see some of your desires for our city realized in this vision— We truly do live in a unique natural setting with tremendous access to our region and the world. Our residents do residents enjoy remarkable quality of life and economic opportunity. As we look toward 2050, lets be sure the city’s residents enjoy diverse opportunities for life-long learning, creating, working, playing and relaxing. Let’s make sure residents enjoy a friendly atmosphere and ample places to know and enjoy one another, whether in vibrant urban districts with a regional draw, or in quiet neighborhoods that feature gathering places with churches, schools, shops, cafés and places to enjoy other activities. Let’s make sure residents can enjoy Layton’s open lands, taking advantage of creek side trails running from the mountains to the lake, and places where nature and rural character are treasured and preserved.

Slide 71

Again, we are deeply grateful for your care and concern about your city! Your help has been tremendous! And this is just the beginning—the vision will be carried forward by the city, but also by you and the organizations that you lead and participate in. Imagine how your role as a business person, or a neighbor or a mom matters to our future, how you will be involved. Intro guests Jeff Edwards speaks about partnerships, sure sites, East Gate projects (Janicki Industries, Khihomac) Lonnie speaks about his respect for Layton’s work and its citizens, and his involvement in IHC Bishop Burton speaks about how Utahns get together to solve problems and prepare for the future, how the Layton process embodies this. Mayor announces that a Committee of Champions will be formed to focus on implementation of vision and principles. City will continue the positive momentum created by such projects as: FrontRunner station area improvements, circulator bus service between FrontRunner station and Mall area, Downtown redevelopment (train station renovation, new residential projects), Intermountain Layton Hospital, I-15 interchange, I-15 Layton Crossing (flyover), Highway 89 improvements.

Slide 72

Thank people for coming. Invite them to stick around. List of displays, reasons to stay. (kudos to SeaQuest aquarium, UDOT, IHC, Layton Parks and Trails, WSU-Davis, Utopia) Thanks to Chick fil A, Coca Cola Before you do that turn to someone you don’t know and introduce yourself! (come say hi to me!)

Slide 1

Vision Summit Welcome!

Slide 2

What do you envision?

Slide 4

Envision Layton Executive Committee Kristin Elinkowski – Co-Chair Brett Nilsson, Planning Commission – Co-Chair Joyce Brown, City Council Preston Cox Bruce Davis Jewel Lee Kenley Robert J Stevenson, Mayor Joy Petro, City Council Dave Weaver, Planning Commission Spencer Young

Slide 5

Envision Layton Stakeholder Group P Hugh Parke Tim Pehrson Jared Price David Paulsen Randy Pulham R Barbara Riddle Theresa Russell Brody Rypien S Bill Sanders Greg Sargent Craig Saxton Verdi Schill Luke Schroeder Patrick Scott Stan Searle Ron Stallworth Jake Stapp Sheryl Starkey Fred Stettler Val Stratford Brady Stratton Bryan Stubbles   A Daneen Adams Brent Allen B David Bailey Jamie Bateman Sara Beckstead Randy Benoit Brian Bodily Kathie Bone Mike Bouwhuis Dawn Brandvold C Amber Cypers D Chris Dallin Jay Dansie Tom Day Nancy Dejong Daren Deru Barbara Dibble E Sharon Esplin F Brian Fitzpatrick Dawn Fitzpatrick Jed Florence Jory Francis Scott Freitag Janene Fresques Norm Frost Pam Fullmer G Gabe Garn Gerald Gilbert Ed Green H Wynn Hansen Ben Hart Chad Harward Anne Hunsinger J Cory Jenkins K Chris Kimball Ron King Mike Kolendrianos L Mary Lamb Ron Layton Don Lever Krista Ligman Kris Long Scott Lunt M Marshall McKinnon Patrick McReaken Jim Morris Jeff Motta N Lynn Nestor Wes Nestor Bruce Nilson O Steven Oliver Ariel Osmond Mike Ostermiller Jeff Oyler T Clinton Tams U Tom Uriona V Robert Van Drunen Bill Van Dyke W, Y, Z Jarren Webb David Webster Jeff Whitesides Don Wilhelm Lance Wolfley Doug Wood Steve Woolley Jay Yahne Chris Young Sonia Zisumbo  

Slide 6

A Public Stakeholder Process 1. Provides research and information to the public 2. Seeks broad public input 3. Builds plans directly from public input 4. Uses transparent methods 5. Builds momentum for implementation

Slide 7

The Premise The “public” has the right to choose its future—public officials should serve that vision. The “public” will make good choices if presented with real options.

Slide 8

Scenario Approach Contrast today’s choices by showing long-term consequences

Slide 9

“If you don’t know where you’re going, then any old road will do.” - Lewis Carroll

Slide 10

The Process 1. Public Workshops (Brainstorm) 2. Town Hall Meetings (Test: This, Not This) 3. Vision Summit (Consensus) 4. Implementation (Ready, Set, Action!) Spring/Summer Fall/Winter Spring Ongoing

Slide 11

Source. Utah GOPB and Layton City Baseline Data How much have we grown? How much will we grow? 23,000 new residents

Slide 12

y u v w x How do housing needs change over a lifetime? Where have you lived at various stages of your life? How about your friends and family? What are their needs?

Slide 13

Where are the jobs? Source. Utah Dept. of Workforce Services

Slide 14

Where do we work? Source. Utah Dept. of Workforce Services 18,987 3,897 Commuting In LAYTON

Slide 15

Types of Jobs and Wages $22,000/year $36,000-40,000/year

Slide 16

How long do buildings last? Source: Arthur C. Nelson, Presidential Professor & Director of Metropolitan Research, University of Utah, based on DoE Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey.

Slide 17

Hundreds of Citizen Voices Workshops & Online Survey Conversation Mapping Polling

Slide 18

Quality of Life Goals Expand cultural opportunities. Retain viable agricultural land. Expand trail network. Improve and maintain transportation access. Improve choice and affordability of housing. Improve the quality and amount of family sustaining jobs. Create a balanced and sustainable economy. Preserve and enhance open space. Improve connectivity of transit system. Establish a strong community identity.

Slide 19

Brainstorming! Your Ideal Future Imagine the future for your children and grandchildren… How shall we accommodate anticipated growth?

Slide 20

What is a scenario? Built from ideas that come from the public Exploration of HOW we should grow WHERE will we live? HOW will we live? WHAT will we conserve? WHERE will we PLAY? Where will we WORK? What will our COMMUNITY be like?

Slide 21

Scenario A – (Baseline)

Slide 26

Like Selecting Ingredients to Make a Meal Scenario Shopping (Not a Prepackaged Dinner)

Slide 28

What did we learn? Which scenario results in a future for Layton that I am excited about and would help support?

Slide 29

Big Ideas Agricultural conservation: preserving rural feel and function Mixed uses (blended housing, shopping and jobs) Redevelopment and infill Family sustaining jobs Parks and trails network top pick: 21%

Slide 30

Agricultural Conservation: Preserving Rural Feel and Function

Slide 31

Big Ideas Agricultural conservation: conservation subdivisions/other options Mixed uses (blended housing, shopping and jobs) Redevelopment and infill Family sustaining jobs Parks and trails network Top pick: 51%

Slide 32

What is mixed-use development? Destinations are blended and tend to be closer than in suburban development The Mixed-Use Neighborhood or Town

Slide 33

Post 1950 (Single Use)

Slide 34

Post 1950 (Single Use)

Slide 38

Big Ideas Agricultural conservation: conservation subdivisions/other options Mixed uses (blended housing, shopping and jobs) Redevelopment and infill Family sustaining jobs Parks and trails network 35% selected either “improve quality and amount of family-sustaining jobs” or “create a balanced and sustainable economy” as their top quality of life goal for the city

Slide 39

Family Sustaining Jobs Comfortable balance between wages and the cost of living in Layton Grow the economy to match skills, education and interests of residents

Slide 40

Big Ideas Agricultural conservation: conservation subdivisions/other options Mixed uses (blended housing, shopping and jobs) Redevelopment and infill Family sustaining jobs Parks and trails network 25% selected either “expand trail network” or “preserve and enhance open space” as their top quality of life goal for the city

Slide 41

Parks and Trails: Regional Systems/Local Networks

Slide 42

You Envisioned Layton Your voice. Your vision. Your Layton.

Slide 43

Vision Statement Layton lies nestled between the beautiful Wasatch Mountains and the Great Salt Lake, just north of Salt Lake City. With a unique natural setting and tremendous access to the region and beyond, Layton’s residents enjoy remarkable quality of life and economic opportunity.

Slide 44

Vision Statement The city’s residents enjoy diverse opportunities for life-long learning, creating, working, playing and relaxing, all within the city itself. Residents enjoy a friendly atmosphere and ample places to know and enjoy one another, whether in vibrant urban districts with a regional draw, where many live and enjoy employment, shopping, dining and other activities; or in quiet neighborhoods that feature gathering places with churches, schools, shops, cafés and places to enjoy other activities.

Slide 45

Vision Statement Residents also appreciate Layton’s open lands, taking advantage of creek side trails running from the mountains to the lake, where nature and rural character are treasured and neighborhoods are specially designed to preserve and enhance natural lands and agricultural heritage and operations. In Layton, life is great from the mountains to the lake.

Slide 46

Neighborhoods & Housing Principle | 1 We value living in Layton. We choose to preserve and enhance existing neighborhoods.

Slide 47

Neighborhoods & Housing Principle | 1 We value living in Layton. We choose to preserve and enhance existing neighborhoods.

Slide 48

Neighborhoods & Housing Principle | 2 We love our farms. We protect opportunities to live in a rural atmosphere.

Slide 49

Neighborhoods & Housing Principle | 2 We love our farms. We protect opportunities to live in a rural atmosphere.

Slide 50

Neighborhoods & Housing Principle | 2 We love our farms. We protect opportunities to live in a rural atmosphere.

Slide 51

Neighborhoods & Housing Principle | 3 We are a regional city. We embrace our urban identity, with a range of places to live for people in all stages of life.

Slide 52

Economy Principle | 4 We have tremendous access to the region and beyond. We build on our connectedness.

Slide 53

Economy Principle | 4 We have tremendous access to the region and beyond. We build on our connectedness.

Slide 54

Economy Principle | 4 We have tremendous access to the region and beyond. We build on our connectedness.

Slide 55

Economy Principle | 5 We’re a regional leader. We embody economic opportunity in our region and contribute to its prosperity and quality of life.

Slide 56

Economy Principle | 6 We have space to grow our economy. We direct investment toward areas of opportunity.

Slide 57

Economy Principle | 6 We have space to grow our economy. We direct investment toward areas of opportunity.

Slide 58

Economy Principle | 6 We have space to grow our economy. We direct investment toward areas of opportunity.

Slide 59

Economy Principle | 7 We’re proud of our gifted workforce. We attract and keep talented people by providing diverse opportunities for living, learning and working.

Slide 60

Economy Principle | 8 We are economically sustainable. We take fiscal responsibility seriously; we make strategic investments for a high quality of life.

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Recreation, Culture, Open Space & Agriculture Principle | 9 We love to play. We enjoy recreation, from the mountains and the canyons to the lake and its islands.

Slide 62

Principle | 10 Recreation, Culture, Open Space & Agriculture We walk every day. We knit Layton together with local trails and pathways so we can all get around more easily.

Slide 63

Principle | 11 Recreation, Culture, Open Space & Agriculture Imagine a Golf Course Development Without the Golf Course…. We treasure our agricultural heritage. We preserve agriculture and rural atmosphere, recognizing that it is a part of Layton’s character.

Slide 64

Principle | 12 Recreation, Culture, Open Space & Agriculture We value life-long learning, playing and discovery. We are a regional center for education, culture and recreation.

Slide 65

Principle | 13 Mobility We value convenient ways to get around. We provide a range of transportation options, to give all residents access to our city.

Slide 66

Principle | 14 Mobility We are a transportation hub with access to the region and the world. We enjoy easy access to economic and recreational opportunities.

Slide 67

Vision Map

Slide 68

How does the vision compare?

Slide 69

How does the vision compare? 14% of land remains undeveloped, with open space or agricultural preservation possible Layton continues to remain a city with a majority of single family homes (58%), but diversity increases to better accommodate younger people, older people, and others who need or desire a wider range of options 76% of jobs are professional/office Average wage: $39,815 (vision) | $38,909 (trend scenario) Household income needed to afford a new home: $63,133 (vision)| $105,778 (trend) Transportation Miles of new roads: 37 (vision | 54 (trend) Miles driven per household: 19 (vision)|25 (trend) Miles of bike lanes/trails: 28 (vision) |8.9 trend)

Slide 71

The Vision is just the beginning … The vision is carried forward by your city… … and by you, active citizens working together on common goals.

Slide 72

Thank you, Layton residents! You’re the best! #IloveLayton

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