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Slide 1

Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations Drugǎ B, Turko P, Spaak P, Pomati F, 2016. Environmental Science & Technology, 50: 3416−3424.

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Cyanobacterial blooms are among the strongest indicators of the degradation of freshwater natural environments http://www.ecoevoblog.com

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Cyanobacterial blooms are among the strongest indicators of the degradation of freshwater natural environments http://www.ecoevoblog.com http://dna-barcoding.blogspot.ro/2012/12/water-fleas-in-middle-earth.html

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Context Both toxic and nontoxic cyanobacteria, may alter food webs, because of their interaction with zooplankton. The literature - contradictory results on this interaction. We tackled for the problem of zooplankton-cyanobacteria interactions in a transgenerational experiment.

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Experiment 8 Daphnia galeata strains, hatched from resting eggs from the sediments of Greifensee, Switzerland Scenedesmus acutus serving as “good food” Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 and a non-toxic mutant

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Experiment Reset the experiment after 4, 7 and 10 weeks: Daphnia used for microsatellites test Control Non-toxic Toxic

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Partial correlation between growth rate and population dynamics

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Partial correlation between growth rate and population dynamics

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Partial correlation between growth rate and population dynamics

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Partial correlation between growth rate and population dynamics

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Partial correlation between growth rate and population dynamics

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Partial correlation between growth rate and population dynamics

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Genotype dynamics vary with food source

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Gene expression Three chymotrypsins: CT383, CT448 and CT802 Three trypsins: T152, T208 and T610 18S and 28S rRNA genes Ubq (Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme)

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Three genes are up-regulated under non-toxic conditions

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Three genes are up-regulated under non-toxic conditions

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Ubq gene correlates with tolerance under non-toxic conditions

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Under toxic conditions, the genes for T610 and Ubq make the difference

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Under toxic conditions, the genes for T610 and Ubq make the difference

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Ubq and T610 genes correlate with tolerance under toxic conditions

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Conclusions Daphnia population growth rates may partially explain genotype dynamics in competition Daphnia genotype dynamics varies with cyanobacterial toxicity The T610 and Ubq genes are upregulated so that Daphnia can cope with the presence of toxic Microcystis

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THANK YOU!

Summary: Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations

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