2017 NCEA Helping Teachers and Students Collaborate With Technology

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Slide 2

Welcome. I want to share a little about how I became involved in collaborative projects. I am a former PK-8 technology and middle school math teacher. I am completing my third year as the K-12 Director of Instructional Technology for the 95 schools in the Archdiocese of Newark. I have my contact information on this screen and I will display it again at the end of the presentation. When I was teaching my students, I began with the usual technology projects: the use of the Internet, tools from Microsoft Office, drawing and painting. We did some typing and a lot of digital citizenship. Around 2007 I became acquainted with educators on Twitter. As we got to know each other we began to explore ways that our students could work together. From that point on, I was always looking for collaborative projects for students. It gave them real reasons to work online and produce work. It gave them practical experience in digital citizenship. It got them to know students around the world. I remember having students come in at 7pm to meet with students from Australia who were having a snack at 10am.

Slide 3

On the program agenda, I said that we will have a set of objectives. We will begin by discussing the different types of collaborative projects. You may have an idea in mind, but I want to show you the expanse of ways you can have your students collaborate. Once we have that base, we can talk about the components of a collaborative project. Finally we will look at resources that you can use if you want to start a project of your own.

Slide 4

In addition to the paper handout I have out front, my presentation slides can be downloaded from the NCEA app as well as the handout.

Slide 5

In addition, I want to share my website with you. This website is used by the technology integration specialists in the schools in the Archdiocese of Newark. On the last link, I have my presentation materials under conferences. I will include my handout as a PDF as well as a link to the PowerPoint version of the slides with notes. I always tell the tech integration specialists that I want to save them time, so if you feel the slides or handout is useful, but you’d like to modify it please do. Also, I keep all the workshop materials from my tech specialist workshops here, so if you feel that you can use it in your building or your diocese, please take advantage of it. Yesterday Jonathan Doyle said God put us here for a reason.. My reason is to help with technology in schools and I want to share as widely as possible.

Slide 6

I’d like to point out that the handout has a series of links. I’m not a big fan of paper because I can’t click on links. You can use the PDF and jump to the links from there. I’d also like to point out that on the back of the handout is something called a 3-2-1. As you are listening and learning, please look for three things you want to remember and write them down. We’ve all been to so many interesting and wonderful sessions. I know I hear really good ideas, but if I don’t write them down, they slip away quickly. Then look for two things you want to tell someone else. We remember better when we tell someone about it. Finally, I’d like you to write down one commitment that you will do in the next 30 days. Again, you want to do something with what you learn!

Slide 7

We are going to look at a wide variety of collaborative projects that use technology. It is important that you always think about student learning first then layer on technology. As well look at the projects, I want you to think about what type of learning is happening – what subject area knowledge and how does it connect to Catholic Gospel values or faith connections.

Slide 8

I want to share a little background on why I started these projects. When I began in my position, it was newly created. One of the first tasks I was asked to do was to create a technology curriculum core map for PreK to eighth grade. It took about two years. I worked with over 60 schools as we looked at state technology standards and ISTE standards. ISTE is the International Society for Technology in Education. The goal was to have a set of standards for all the schools in the Archdiocese of Newark. They were to be the minimum all students would be able to do at each grade level and by the time they graduated eighth grade. I also had teachers from the high school level join me to define a profile of a technologically proficient freshman. We then did a backwards walk to make sure that we would have our students prepared. We just began the process for the twelfth grade. Either by July or early next year, we should have graduation skills for twelfth graders. I want to convene groups of college educators, business individuals, and the military to talk about the skills they would like to see in those who have just graduated high school. As I worked with the elementary teachers, I was gratified to see they wanted to include standards that would require our students to collaborate and communicate in online spaces outside their school building. The problem is that it caused some anxiety in the teachers. Some were nervous about collaborating with any school outside their own building, so we talked about collaborating between classes in the building. I asked them if they thought they would feel comfortable having their students collaborate with just schools in the Archdiocese of Newark. Many thought that would be ok. Since I had been participating in and running global collaborative projects, I decided to run a couple for just the Archdiocesan schools.

Slide 9

The projects have evolved over the last two years. Last year I started a collaborative story writing project and an audio project. This year I repeated those projects and included two more: a monster drawing project and a Christmas card exchange. At this point, 60% of the elementary schools have participated in at least one of the projects.

Slide 10

It’s also growing in size. I took a look at the statistics. Last year 18 schools participated in the story writing. This year 26 schools joined. We went from 574 students contributing to the stories to 830 this year.

Slide 11

So let’s take a look at the different types of collaborative projects. While these are elementary examples, I invite high schools too. Next year I will be inviting all the Archdiocesan schools as we develop the high school technology curriculum map.

Slide 12

One of my students’ favorites was a Mystery Skype call. This is what I call a one time whole class experience. You may have done this if you have had an expert Skype into your classroom. If this sounds interesting to you, please feel free to fill out the contact form. When I receive your contact information, I will send you an email and share the contact information from the other participating teachers. In a Mystery Skype call, the teachers speak first via email or Skype and arrange for a mutually convenient time that both classes can spend about 20-30 minutes together. The students can all have paper maps and they take turns asking each other a yes/no question. For example, they might say is your school in the Northern Hemisphere. If they answer is yes, everyone in the room can make note of it. Then the other class asks their question. Your class might next think of possible continents in the Northern hemisphere. They might ask if the class is located in North America. Then is it in the United States. Then does the state touch an ocean. This continues until the class figures out where the other class is located. One time I was stunned when my students actually found the other class’ school in California on Google Maps before the end of the call. Some teachers do Mystery Book titles, Mystery Saints, or mystery numbers. So even if your students know where the class is located they can still have this experience. You could even do this between classrooms in the same building. The partner list has classes from across North America. I am looking forward to expanding the list to Catholic schools around the world. Once the students guess, you can have them show each other’s boys and girls uniform and say a prayer or sing a song together. What curriculum connections or faith values can you see in this project?

Slide 13

Another project type of project is long term with the students having individual partners. We pairs students in the early elementary grades to draw a monster, describe it, and then pass just the description on to their partner. Once the partner redraws the image, it is posted next to the original for the students to compare and contrast the drawings with the description. In this example, Robert drew the monster on the left and wrote the sentences to describe the monster. He needed to think about colors and shapes. Locations of things (left, right, up, down) and sizes. His description was given to another student at another school to draw without seeing the original picture – just the words. Finally, when all the redrawn monsters are online, the students can compare and contrast their original and description with the redrawn monster. This project could easily transition to high schools with a foreign language. The project registration begins around December and the partners are matched by January. You can go to our wiki to see the work in progress. What curriculum connections and faith values might you see in this project?

Slide 14

Another example is a long term project with the students collaborating as a class to create a part of a whole. RCAN Stories has groups of students working together are collaborative stories. Again, this project could be accomplished as a first step in your own building between classrooms or class periods. When I started teaching, before I knew about collaborative projects, I would have all the students in the room on Word. They would write a few sentences and I would have everyone get up and shift two seats. They would read the opening sentences and add the next few until they had shifted a few times and wrote the end of the story. In the RCAN Stories project, I group students by grade level. There might be four or five classes in each story. This year we have 10 stories with students as young as PreK. I didn’t think they would be able to do it, but the story turned out really cute. After each class writes, they include drawings. Those drawing can be digital or with paper and pencil and photographed. This is a project that can easily translate to the high school level.

Slide 15

One of my favorite stories last year was written by a group of fifth grade classes. It was the story of children who were slaves who wanted to escape to the north. As the story was developing I couldn’t imagine what would happen. It kept me on the edge of my seat and I couldn’t wait for each new addition to see where the story would go. Eventually, the slaves were smuggled on a ship, the ship started to capsize. You can read the story online to see how it ends. You can also see some of the illustrations here. It is amazing to see how the faith values we pass on to our students come out in the stories…asking for God’s help, taking care of others, or saying a prayer. What curriculum ties and faith values might you see here?

Slide 16

Finally, the last type of project is one with multiple teachers and partners. This year we did our first Christmas card exchange. It was intended to be really simple. I grouped classes by grade level and they collaboratively created one card for each partner class and mailed the cards. Some classes chose to continue the relationship as pen pals or by having a Skype call. I wanted to make connecting the classes as easy as possible so I also invited teachers to join in a Christmas Carol Google Hangout. Three classes joined – fifth, third, and second grade classes. It really made a mark on the teachers who had never done this before. When I went to visit one of the schools, a teacher saw me in the hall and said, you probably don’t know this but my class was in the Christmas Carol call. I told her that I remembered seeing her on the screen. She thought it was such a great experience for her students! What curriculum ties and faith connections might you see here?

Slide 17

Finally, some classes choose to have students work together in an protected collaborative space such as Edmodo or Google Classroom.

Slide 18

Any questions or comments?

Slide 19

I submitted this proposal under the umbrella of standard 3 Academic Excellence because each project has a technology integration tie to course content. In many of the instances, English Language Arts and social studies but there are fabulous science and math collaborations I have led over the years. The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) introduced the 2016 Student Standards in June 2016. One of the components is called Global Collaborator. These project can help lead teachers and students in the unique skills needed in today’s society that call for an ability to work with others at a distance.

Slide 20

Now that we’ve talked about the types of projects, let’s look at the components that make a project like this work.

Slide 21

As I said before, all projects must begin with student learning. We’ve seen examples that include word processing, geography, arts. It can involve any subject area. I had middle school math students share and compare work between here an a school on a reservation in Canada.

Slide 22

If you think about the writing project and the fifth grade English Language Arts standards for paragraphs, the students are getting at the content while working on skills communicating and collaborating through the Internet.

Slide 23

When a classroom teacher chooses to become involved in a collaborative project they have to decide whether they would like the project to be hidden in a Walled Garden or Open to the World. In a walled garden, a project can be online behind a password protected wall. It can be open for the world to view, as the projects I showed you are.

Slide 24

If you choose to have students collaborate online you need to look at the permission to publish guidelines your parents probably sign every school year. When you post writing, do you want to use first and last name, first name and last initial, or no names. You may not want names associated with images. It depends on your school’s and possibly diocesan guidelines.

Slide 25

The next component is deciding on the size of the project. Do you want a project to just involve your school, your diocese, or the world? Do you want to collaborate synchronously which means at the same time live as in a Mystery Skype or asynchronously like the writing project. The further away in time zones you are the more organization it takes to collaborate face-to-face.

Slide 26

You have to decide on where you want to collaborate. Some school have Skype and Google Hangouts open for use while others have one or more blocked. You might already use a learning management system like Edmodo or Google Classroom which will give you the ability to have a common space to work. I happen to like Wikispaces even though it is a pretty old website. It is free for educators and you can set the privacy from fully password protected – even for viewing to fully open – even for editing while I use protected. Anyone can see it but you need a password to edit it.

Slide 27

Don’t discount paper based projects. You can use a digital camera to use the images online. If you don’t have a digital camera, many schools have iPads with a built-in camera and most teachers have a cell phone with a camera. You can simply email student work between teacher accounts.

Slide 28

You have to decide who will lead your project. It can be a technology teacher, a classroom teacher, or someone from around the world. This is a picture of the first time I met Anna who runs the monster project with me. We met for the first time face-to-face last year after running the project together for nine years.

Slide 29

You have to decide if you want to host your own project or join one. There are a number of projects online. The Global Read Aloud is based on the fact that everyone enjoys having a book read to them – even high school students. The books for the Fall 2017 project were just announced. You can sign up now to be part of the project that occurs around October for six weeks. Classes have an opportunity to partner up and discuss the book. It is open to grades K-12. Projects by Jen are super simple beginner projects for students in Prek-6th grade. They are as simple as having students stack Oreo’s and see how many they can stack before they fall. The teacher reports the class’ number and Jennifer Wagner, who runs the project, reports out the overall total.

Slide 30

If you want to learn more about Global Collaboration projects you can participate in Global Collaboration Day. They are running it again next year on September 21st. Teachers share projects that they would like to have partners for. It is up to 12th grade.

Slide 31

Questions/Comments/Something you’d like to share?

Slide 32

We are going to close by looking at how to begin your own project. While it is beyond the scope of the time we have together to step through tools, I will have YouTube videos you can listen to if you would like to be stepped through some options.

Slide 33

If you want to begin a project within your school, start a conversation at lunch. Share what you would like to try and find someone in the same grade level or a close grade level and partner up. Start small. Just do one project next year. You don’t even have to do it online. When you are ready, move the project online. Take small steps.

Slide 34

It is important to know that in the Archdiocese of Newark, the superintendent required all schools to identify a person as the school’s technology integration specialist. Some are computer teachers. Some are classroom teachers who enjoy using technology. I have the convenience of having these teachers in every elementary school who can support the teachers that join these projects.

Slide 35

I find it extremely convenient to use Google Forms to register teachers for projects. When I create my Google Form I make sure to ask for the teacher’s name. I ask for two email addresses. The school address and a back up because I don’t want someone to have a typo and wonder why no one ever reached out to them to participate in the project. I collect the school name and town. We are in four counties, so I ask for the county. When I invite teachers from across the country, the state is important. If I am matching classes the grade level and number of students is important. I like to have the number of students in general for statistical purposes. It’s fun to see how the project grows or contracts year to year. If I am using a particular website, like Wikispaces, I ask for the user name on that site if they have one.

Slide 36

The Google Form can generate a convenient spreadsheet for sharing information between teachers in the project.

Slide 37

I tend to use Wikispaces as a collaborative platform. One reason is that they are free for teachers to use and I have yet to run out of storage space for images and audio files.

Slide 38

When teachers register I ask them to share a Wikispaces ID. If they do not have one, I create guest ids. Some teachers feel really comfortable signing on to a website with an existing username and password but have trouble creating one of their own. It’s so easy to create spare email addressees and to sign up for a few account usernames to share as guest accounts.

Slide 39

I like to create email groups for convenience. It might take a bit of time once every three weeks to keep up with the projects. Email groups make it easy to keep in touch with the participants. For the stories project I have an email group for everyone. There are 10 stories so I have 10 subgroups if I just need to contact everyone on one story.

Slide 40

Do know that things will go wrong. That’s why you need a project lead. Back in January a teacher was having trouble getting onto Wikispaces. They are a great website with over 99% up time. This one day, they were having an outage. I stepped in and checked with Wikispaces then let everyone on the project know that it would be down for a few hours.

Slide 41

Another time, a teacher got the picture upload to the wiki, but it was sideways. I downloaded the picture and used a photo editing site to rotate it and put it back in the story.

Slide 42

You will also want to do follow up. About every three weeks I check on the project and make sure it is moving along.

Slide 43

I strongly suggest that you want to make it an event. I create simple one page flyers in Word and send them as PDFs to the teachers. It has the steps for the projects, the project name and dates.

Slide 44

As well as which schools are on the project and the website address. It lets the students know that they are part of something bigger than just in the school. It is also great for other teachers to see who in the building is trying something new. It could lead to a conversation and another teacher trying the project the following year.

Slide 45

This is the poster for the six sound project.

Slide 46

If you are looking for images for projects I would suggest Pixabay – but for teachers only. It doesn’t have really rude photos but there may be some that are not right especially at the elementary level. The best part is that the photos are high quality and can be used however you want because the artists use a Creative Commons Public Domain license. You can use them for things you sell, or post them online or edit them.

Slide 47

If you are interested in joining one of our projects, you can go to our collaboration wiki. Underneath the word Subscribe, it says click “HERE.” Click on the word here and fill out the subscription form. I will send you notes as the projects are open for registration.

Slide 48

In the handout I have a link to a Google Doc. It contains a folder with tweets I collected from schools sharing their excitement about being part of the projects.

Slide 49

I also have a folder with emails. Sometimes it’s nice to see how people word things. I have samples of invitations to projects and follow ups.

Slide 50

I had mentioned my YouTube channel. There is a playlist called 2017 NCEA Collaborative Projects with some step-by-step videos you might find helpful. There are also many videos I created to support the teachers in the Archdiocese of Newark. Feel free to use them or share them however it helps you. I have a shortened URL to get to the YouTube channel.

Slide 51

There is also a shortened URL to the Google Drive with files and folders.

Slide 52

We’ve come to the end. If you have any who, what, when, where, why, or hows. I am happy to answer them with the group or feel free to come up to me. I will hang around for a while to answer your questions.

Slide 53

Finally, here is my contact information. OroAnnM is my personal Twitter ID. Rcaninst is the account for technology in the Archdiocese of Newark.

Slide 1

4/21/2017 Ann Oro – Archdiocese of Newark NJ Helping Teachers and Students Collaborate with Technology Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Slide 2

4/21/2017 Helping Teachers and Students Collaborate with Technology Ann Oro Email: oroann@rcan.org Twitter: @OroAnnM/@rcaninst Archdiocese of Newark NJ

Slide 3

You will be able to… describe the types of collaborative projects define components of an online collaborative project utilize session resources to begin a project and manage communication between teachers

Slide 4

NCEA App (Search Oro)

Slide 5

rcantech.weebly.com Conferences link conferences

Slide 6

rcantech.weebly.com Handout

Slide 7

Student learning first

Slide 8

Background catholicschoolsnj.org/curriculum-and-testing/curriculum-mapping

Slide 9

Evolving 15/16 to 16/17 60%

Slide 10

Evolving 15/16 to 16/17 2015-2016 Projects RCAN Stories 18 schools 34 classes 25 teachers (8 tech) 574 students RCAN 6 Sounds 4 schools 6 classes 5 teachers 130 students 2016-2017 Projects RCAN Stories Monster Project 26 schools 9 schools 47 classes 12 classes 40 teachers (6 tech) 12 teachers 830 students 240 students RCAN 6 Sounds RCAN Christmas 2 schools 12 schools 3 classes 26 classes 2 teachers 16 teachers TBD students 537 students

Slide 11

Types of collaborative projects

Slide 12

One time whole class Join our partner list at: www.tinyurl.com/rcancontactform

Slide 13

monsterproject.wikispaces.com

Slide 14

Long term whole class rcanstories.wikispaces.com

Slide 16

rcanchristmas.wikispaces.com

Slide 17

Individual projects School-to-school feedback rcan6sounds.wikispaces.com

Slide 18

Questions?

Slide 19

Academic Excellence www.iste.org/standards/standards/for-students-2016

Slide 20

Components

Slide 21

Student Learning

Slide 22

Student Learning Standards Paragraphs (W.5.4, W.5.10) Compose well-organized and coherent paragraphs that include: Topic sentence Supporting details [Conclusion] Varied sentence structure and length Correct verb tense Consistent voice Use of transition words

Slide 23

Privacy

Slide 24

Family permission to publish guidelines Posting name Full first and last name First name and last initial No names Privacy Considerations

Slide 25

Location

Slide 26

Digital Tools

Slide 27

Digital Tools

Slide 28

Project Lead(s)

Slide 29

Join or DYI Global Read Aloud (K-12) theglobalreadaloud.com Projects by Jen (PreK-6) projectsbyjen.com

Slide 30

Global Collaboration Day (all grades) www.globalcollaborationday.org/projects.html

Slide 32

Begin a Project

Slide 33

Within the School

Slide 34

Technology Integration Specialists rcantech.weebly.com

Slide 35

Between Schools Teacher name 2 email addresses School name Town name County State Grade level Number of students Username on collaboration site

Slide 36

Between Schools

Slide 37

rcanstories.wikispaces.com Project Website

Slide 38

Create Guest Accounts

Slide 39

Email Groups: Your Friend

Slide 40

Things Will Go Wrong

Slide 41

Things Will Go Wrong

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Project Lead: Follow Up

Slide 43

Make It an Event

Slide 44

Make It an Event

Slide 45

Make It an Event

Slide 46

Finding Images pixabay.com (teachers)

Slide 47

rcancollaborate.weebly.com

Slide 48

Sample Tweets

Slide 49

Sample Emails

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www.tinyurl.com/rcanyoutube

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www.tinyurl.com/rcanncea2017

Slide 53

Helping Teachers and Students Collaborate with Technology Ann Oro Email: oroann@rcan.org Twitter: @OroAnnM/@rcaninst Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ 4/21/2017

Summary: Communication, collaboration and creativity are listed in state and ISTE technology standards. Learn how schools worked together on two projects in the Archdiocese of Newark. Using online tools, groups of three to five classes from multiple schools worked together. Classes from kindergarten to 8th grade wrote stories a few paragraphs at a time and created illustrations. The activity culminated in a set of eight full stories. In a second project, students created audio stories of 60 seconds that included six specific sound effects. You can do it, too! Let’s talk about bringing the projects across state lines!

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