#1 edWeb.net/emergingtech Session 1 (July 2010) - Introduction & Overview

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The cognitive differences between digital natives and digital immigrants are being documented.

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The facebook generation is different. Business leaders, scientists, economists, and educators are taking note. We attached a bibliography to our edWeb community blog this weekend. Here are a handful of the books on the list. We’ll talk more about these next month. Clayton Christensen (15), Steven Covey (14), Thomas Freidman (12), Howard Gardner (11), Urs Gasse & John Palfrey (10), Malcom Gladwell (9), The Kaiser Family Foundation (8), Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner (13), Daniel Pink, Tony Wagner, just to name a few, are writing, blogging and talking about the differences between millennials and previous generations. Digital natives are forging a new path in cognitive development. Click.

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Filter information quickly Make snap decisions Disclose information freely Network online Process information differently Contribute to many information communities So basically, digital natives are forging a new path in cognitive development. Some of these shifts are scary, some are great, but the big question is: what are schools, and more specifically school libraries, doing to adapt? Click

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As a school librarian, I teach what to many students seems utterly inconsequential. Really, from a 21st century kid’s perspective, why listen to someone drone on about how to conduct proper research when “I can just Google it, or better yet, use Wikipedia?” And what could be more debilitating for a 21st Century learner that to try to focus on a lesson detailing the formatting requirements of the Modern Language Association for Works Cited lists? Show clip Given the aforementioned cognitive and attitudinal challenges, what are digital natives actually understanding when we teach with a traditional, lecture-style approach? And how is this preparing students for model citizenship in the 21st century? Click

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The Partnership for 21st Century Learning asks us to embed all of the following in our instruction: Accountability Adaptability Collaboration Communication Creativity Critical thinking Cross-cultural skills Flexibility Information literacy Initiative Innovation Leadership Media literacy Problem solving Productivity Responsibility Self-direction Social interaction Technology literacy That’s a daunting list! Just what we need, right? More stuff to do.

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So at this point, you might be asking where does the emerging tech piece come in? Play clip By the way, the only one who knew what Web 2.0 technology was is the kid who got her first Facebook account last spring! Which leads me to …click

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A true story: When my daughter was about three, I explained that when I was a kid, there were no videos, and that when her dad, was a kid, there was no TV. She said, “No videos? No TV? CLICK!!!! Was there food? This is why the kids in that film clip don’t know what Web 2.0 technology is. It’s as natural to them as their daily sustenance. It is, in a way, and extension of them selves. So why not use that for instruction? This, by the way, is the same kid, being dropped off for her freshman year of college last fall. She is studying filmmaking at Emerson, in Boston. 15 mn

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In order to capitalize on the social networking strengths of new learners, we, at NCHS library, are experimenting with six new technologies to make learning more interactive, and therefore more engaging for students. Facebook: for communicate with NCHS community about curricular and co-curricular activities Moodle: online course platform like Blackboard or eChalk, but open-source, which is to say, free! Twitter: for tech support VoiceThread: online book discussion Google Apps: collaboration, communication, publication, and data collection YouTube: tutorials These are just examples of how we embed emerging technology, but as we proceed in the series, we explore other tools to meet similar objectives.

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We use facebook for announcements and videos that are observational in nature. It is more of a communication tool than anything else, but the 2.0 piece does come in after we post pictures or video of student activities. Click. For example, here is a follow up conversation between members of a book discussion group. We had our monthly face-to-face “library chat” on The Scarlet Pimpernel, and, after the event, pictures were posted, as well as quotes from the discussion. Then other students responded to the posts. So in essence, a conversation about a co-curricular activity that might have ended that evening at 7PM carried on over the course of the next 36 hours online. You may see unrelated comments here like “I’m going to Vermont.” and wonder how that is educationally relevant. It isn’t But it is precisely the blending of social and school lives that makes this such a useful too. Without the library Facebook page, the conversation would have been strictly social, we have an opportunity to “infiltrate” their social world with education. Let’s not squander the opportunity. Click We post photos and video demonstrating how students used the library. Sometimes, students subsequently posted comments about activities and events that occurred in the library. Click We are now up to 133 fans from the 88 shown here, which is still only 10% of our student population, so this is still in its infancy. We have made one interesting observation, though. On Facebook, we have 12% more male fans than female – which is the complete the opposite of our in-person “fan” base. We are trying to figure out how to make the best academic use of this new following. We turned admin rights over to a handful of carefully selected students. We attribute the recent 33% surge in activity to their involvement. Our use of Facebook is helping students build the following 21st century skills: Communication Collaboration Media literacy Self-direction Social interaction Leadership Responsibility

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Accountability Adaptability Collaboration Communication Creativity Critical thinking Cross-cultural skills Flexibility Information literacy Initiative Innovation Leadership Media literacy Problem solving Productivity Responsibility Self-direction Social interaction Technology literacy

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Though you can’t see it here, this is a lab full of kids on their own facebook page. Pros: Teaches students responsible use of social network Obliges students to be more cautious with posted media and status updates See tool as utilitarian, advancing productivity, rather than procrastination Cons: 1. Possible distraction 2. Bullying AUPs?

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Moodle is our online course platform. In the fall of 2008, we moved our entire instructional program online so that we could teach it in a hybrid format, which is to say that we offer face-to-face instruction as well as online instruction. Every project that has come through the library, since October 2008 has been uploaded to the Moodle along with research instructions for students and a plethora of support materials. Moodle enrollment is voluntary. We can’t force a New Canaan High School student to join the library course. In October of 2009, we set a goal of securing 1,000 enrollee by June 2009. By June, we had uploaded over 100 projects with instructions, well over 200 support materials for students, and reached our goal by enlisting 1,008 student enrollees. We feel that a 77% membership is an impressive accomplishment for our first year. Now we have 1,758, but that includes overlap between quarters. So you may be wondering why we are so eager to get kids into the Moodle. Click This is the Moodle. As you can see, we have embedded a Google calendar with the library schedule, important links, password and access codes, and, of course projects. Click Here you have a fairly typical project block. We suggest library resources, search strategies, and offer a forum where student can collaborate. We share this block with classroom teachers and librarians at the town library, so that we all work toward the common goal of helping students. In this case, the classroom teacher posted several documents that provide instructions for the technical component of this project. Click The currency and reach of this medium is valuable. This is an example of sharing one student’s experience with the larger group for instructional purposes. These are conversations from one Moodle forum. Enrollees in this forum, which involved the entire NCHS class of 2010 (287 students), posted their English research paper topics here. They were asked to search within the forum for other students researching similar topics to their own, and follow the research instructions posted there. Again, town librarians, classroom teachers and school librarians, all followed this forum via email – all posts are directed to subscribers’ email inboxes, as well as the forum. There are several phenomenal pedagogical advantages to this system. Click

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Here are the 21st century skills that using an online course platform helps with Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility

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So, do you hate Twitter yet?

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But microblogging can be an exceptionally useful productivity tool – particularly with digital natives who want concise and timely responses to queries. Click

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We use our Twitter to post answers to questions that are asked over and over again. It now synced with our Facebook page so your news and updates are pushed out. We haven’t decided if this is a good thing or not. Click.

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Hold up your index card if you think this use of Web 2.0 technology might help build the skill on your card.

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Hold up your card if you think using Twitter might help your students build the skill identified on your card

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VoiceThread is a very simple interactive, Web-based, blog-like tool. We chose to use this resource as an online book discussion. We started by adding 50 books, and by the end of the 2008-2009 school year we were up to 235 books, requested by students and faculty, to which the NCHS community had posted over 250 comments. To support VoiceThread, we linked each book to another social network for readers called LibraryThing. Here, we added information about who recommended the books, and what age group they were best suited to. We supported the VoiceThread online discussion with a physical collection of books prominently displayed at the circulation desk in the library media center. As often as possible, we purchased multiple copies of books to which students had posted the most comments.

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Hold up your card if you think using VoiceThread might help your students build the skill identified on your card

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Hold up your card if you think using YouTube might help your students build the skill identified on your card

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Last Tuesday, Tom Friedman’s column called not for more education, but for the right education. The 21st century workplace calls for people who can imagine, create, take risks, move fast, and collaborate. The only way to prepare our kids for this is through immersion in resources that provide such opportunities. Web 2.0 technologies can help us do that.

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Last Tuesday, Tom Friedman’s column called not for more education, but for the right education. The 21st century workplace calls for people who can imagine, create, take risks, move fast, and collaborate. The only way to prepare our kids for this is through immersion in resources that provide such opportunities. Web 2.0 technologies can help us do that.

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Pink, D. H. (2009). Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us . New York: Riverhead. Pink, D. (2006). A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. Boston: Riverhead Trade. Report: Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-Year-Olds - Kaiser Family Foundation. (2010, January 10). The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation - Health Policy, Media Resources, Public Health Education & South Africa - Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved February 15, 2010, from http://www.kff.org/entmedia/8010.cfm Small, G., & Vorgan, G. (2008). iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind. New York: Collins Living. Tapscott, D., & Williams, A. D. (2007). Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything. Ottawa: Portfolio Hardcover. Wagner, T. (2008). The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need--And What We Can Do About It. New York: Basic Books. (2008). Teaching the Digital Generation: No More Cookie-Cutter High Schools. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

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Using Emerging Technologies to Advance Your School Library Program Session 1 - Overview Michelle Luhtala EdWeb.net July 13, 2010

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Why change? “No, you weren’t downloaded. You were born.” http://twitpic.com/s2tzr

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Generation “i” brains?

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Filter information quickly Make snap decisions Disclose information freely Network online Process information differently Contribute to many information communities Digital natives….

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Traditional approach to instruction

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http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/index.php?Itemid=120&id=254&option=com_content&task=view Life and career skills Flexibility and adaptability Initiative and self-direction Social and cross-cultural skills Productivity and accountability Leadership and responsibility 21st Century Skills Framework (P21) Learning and innovation skills Creativity and innovation Critical thinking and problem solving http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/index.php?Itemid=120&id=254&option=com_content&task=view Information, media and technology skills Information literacy Media literacy ICT literacy

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Emerging tech?

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Technology, to a digital native is… Was there food?

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So where do we begin?

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Facebook

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Facebook skills Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility

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Kids in labs on Facebook... What are the advantages? What are the disadvantages?

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Moodle Peter: “The effect rap music has on teenagers throughout America. Positive or negative?” Alex: “Dude, Gron [nickname], my idea is so similar to yours!” Alex: “Should atheletes in the public eye be good role models?  are they obligated to be?" Andrew: “What kind of an influence do athletes have on children/adolescents? Should they be viewed as role models?" Lexi: “How does family life pyschologically change the lives of children?” Lindsay: “Hey I’ve used Opposing Viewpoints for some background and I am onto the nature v. nurture book.” Lexi [revised]: “What are the pyschological effects on the teenage minds within a blended or divorced family?” Mike: “Heyyyy im pretty much doing the same thing. I am doing how to deal with younger teenagers in a divorce"

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Breanna on Moodle

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Moodle skills Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility

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Twitter A librarian’s worst nightmare

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Instantaneous Disseminated from almost any kind of device Accessed from almost any kind of device Really short – 140 characters or less Disposable Twitter is

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Twitter with purpose Geo Sketchpad. Save Ms. Klein's Geo Sketchpad file from her website, then go to Geo Sketchpad from the start menu - File - Open - Open file. New protocol for logging on to the network. Ask someone if you need help. Can't publish it here for security reasons. Applies to Moodle too.

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Andrew on Twitter

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Twitter skills Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility

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VoiceThread

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VoiceThread skills Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility

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Kolten on VoiceThread

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YouTube Your Formatting Bibliographies video really helped me out!!! I was using Tab and screwing everything up. Thanks!

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Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility YouTube Skills

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Devon and Kiki on YouTube

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Google Apps

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Creativity Innovation Critical thinking Problem solving Communication Collaboration Information literacy Media literacy Flexibility Adaptability Initiative Self-direction Social interaction Cross-cultural skills Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility Google Apps

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THE NEW UNTOUCHABLES Tom Friedman’s column from October 20, 2009 Smarter ways to do old jobs Energy-saving ways to provide new services New ways to attract old customers New ways to combine existing technologies Educational Priorities The 4 Cs Creativity & Innovation Critical thinking Communication Collaboration

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THE NEW UNTOUCHABLES Tom Friedman’s column from October 20, 2009 Smarter ways to do old jobs Energy-saving ways to provide new services New ways to attract old customers New ways to combine existing technologies Educational Priorities The 4 Cs Creativity & Innovation Critical thinking Communication Collaboration

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References Auletta, K. (2009). Googled: The End of the World As We Know It. New York: Penguin Press. Christensen, C. M., Horn, M. B., & Johnson, C. W. (2008). Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns. New York: McGraw-Hill. Chubb, J. E., & Moe, T. M. (2009). Liberating Learning: Technology, Politics, and the Future of Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Covey, S. R. (2004). The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. New York City: Free Press. Do School Libraries Need Books? - Room for Debate Blog - NYTimes.com. (2010, February 10). News Debate and Analysis - Room for Debate Blog - NYTimes.com. Retrieved February 12, 2010, from http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/do-school-libraries-need-books/ FRONTLINE: Digital Nation. (2010, February 2). PBS. Retrieved February 15, 2010, from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/digitalnation/view/ Friedman, T. L. (2009, October 21). The New Untouchables. New York Times, p. 31. Retrieved October 24, 2009, from the ProQuest Platinum database. Friedman, T. L. (2006). The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century. New York: Farrar. Straus And Giroux. Gardner, H. (2009). Five Minds for the Future. New York: Harvard Business School Press. Gladwell, M. (2008). Outliers. London: Little, Brown and Company. Goodstein, A. (2007). Totally Wired: What Teens and Tweens Are Really Doing Online. New York, New York: St. Martin's Griffin. Johnson, M. (2010). This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All. New York: Harper. Lenhart, A. (2010, February 3). Social Media and Young Adults | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved February 15, 2010, from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspxp Palfrey, J. (2008). Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives. New York: Basic Books. Pink, D. H. (2009). Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us . New York: Riverhead. Pink, D. (2006). A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. Boston: Riverhead Trade. Report: Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-Year-Olds - Kaiser Family Foundation. (2010, January 10). The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation - Health Policy, Media Resources, Public Health Education & South Africa - Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved February 15, 2010, from http://www.kff.org/entmedia/8010.cfm Small, G., & Vorgan, G. (2008). iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind. New York: Collins Living. Tapscott, D., & Williams, A. D. (2007). Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything. Ottawa: Portfolio Hardcover. Wagner, T. (2008). The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need--And What We Can Do About It. New York: Basic Books. (2008). Teaching the Digital Generation: No More Cookie-Cutter High Schools. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

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EdWeb live chat starts now at www.edWeb.net/emergingtech

Summary: Note: All rights to edWeb.net presentations below belong to edWeb.net Please contact Lisa Schmucki (lisa@edweb.net) for permission to republish. Discuss the impact of social media on school library program success, highlight the need for open access, the reticence among CTOs, and solutions that benefit all stakeholders. More on author at at http://bibliotech.me Webinar recording available (free) at http://edweb.net/emergingtech

Tags: webinar edweb.net emerging technology luhtala librarians school teacher mluhtala web 2.0 collaborative technologies social media education k-12 learning instruction evidence-based practice

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