Coaching with Positive Expectations

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Welcome to our coaching with positive expectations class.   What is the definition of self-fulfilling prophesy? Do you believe that your expectations of others have an impact?  

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Connections to the Principles, Philosophy General Purpose, Process Objectives – we’ve shortened the number

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Explain the Pygmalion Effect, also called the Rosenthal effect. The paintings featured here are the second series painted by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones. Text and images are from The Tale of Pygmalion Told in a Series of Four Paintings By Stephanie Pina (http://preraphaelitesisterhood.com/?p=203) Burne-Jones introduces us to Pygmalion in the first painting, Pygmalion and Galatea I: The Heart Desires. He stands in contemplation. His back turned to the living women in the doorway. And yet he’s not looking at the women depicted in statue either (the statues are the three graces, by the way). But look at the floor. We can see, reflected, an array of body parts…posterior, thighs, etc. Pygmalion does not look at these. He ignores the living women, the statues of women, the reflection of femininity. Instead, we can assume that he is thinking of the perfect woman that exists only in Pygmalion’s head, the women that he shall soon sculpt.

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Evaluate your beliefs about people at work In the second picture of the series (Pygmalion and Galatea II: The Hand Refrains), we see Pygmalion has been busy at work. In the doorway, we can still see local women in the distance……real, flesh and blood women that Pygmalion has disdained. He has created the woman of his dreams, his perfect woman. He admires her now, all the hard work is done. We can see his tools at the base of the statue. He has created her and he loves what he has created.

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Describe the Four Positive Expectation Factors According to Metamorphoses, Pygmalion prays to the goddess Aphrodite, hoping she will bless him with a wife that will be just as wonderful and perfect as the statue he has created. This was a bold step for the sculptor, as he had essentially shunned Aphrodite in the past. So we see in the third painting of the series (Pygmalion and Galatea III: The Godhead Fires) that Aphrodite has visited Pygmalion’s statue. Their arms entwined, we now see the presence of doves and flowers that were never present in the studio before. The goddess has brought life into the studio, and to Galatea (Pygmalion’s creation). This is my favorite painting of the series. There is a beauty quite different from the other pictures. What do you think?

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Use the Four Factors to coach and communicate your expectations of others in the workplace. In the final picture (Pygmalion and Galatea IV: The Soul Attains) Pygmalion discovers that his statue has come to life. His prayers to Aphrodite have been heard and granted. He kneels at her feet, apparently grateful that his ultimate dream has come true. Famously, the Pygmalion story was the inspiration of George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion which in turn was the basis for the musical My Fair Lady.

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So based on your current knowledge of this class, of coaching and of positive expectation, what positive expectations do you have as you begin to coach (coach more) with positive expectation?   Please take a minute and consider this. Introductions: State your name, department and one expectation you have when you apply what you learned when you get back.   (We’ll check this list again before you leave today.) Q: What prevents us from having these positive expectations?

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Which do you see? A rabbit? Or a duck? It depends on how you look at it, right? We’re asking you to apply that same principle to your beliefs about people and work while here in this class.

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Which do you see? A rabbit? Or a duck? It depends on how you look at it, right? We’re asking you to apply that same principle to your beliefs about people and work while here in this class.

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Which do you see? A rabbit? Or a duck? It depends on how you look at it, right? We’re asking you to apply that same principle to your beliefs about people and work while here in this class.

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So, challenge your beliefs and be open to seeing them in a new way. It can make all the difference. Tagamet: as you look at this slide and the actual studies conducted on this stomach medication, what does it tell you? Key: about ½ of the positive results of the study was a result of the placebo. Norman Cousins also was able to prove the power of laughter – a very positive expectation – in the self-healing process   Today: Challenge your way of thinking

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Thomas Kuhn used the duck-rabbit optical illusion to demonstrate the way in which a paradigm shift could cause one to see the same information in an entirely different way. (From Wikipedia)

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The ABCs of Pygmalion – if the Power of Positive Expectation   Set up the Video Power Point LG – Page 19, 20 21 Booklet - page 2, 3, 4

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We cannot behave or act in a manner that is inconsistent with our expectations and beliefs (of others or ourselves).

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Our behaviors and actions toward others influence their expectations, behaviors, and performance either positively or negatively.

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Our expectations become a self-fulfilling prophecy, partly because we will act in a manner that is consistent with that prophecy and cause it to be fulfilled.

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Helping you bring out the potential of your staff members.

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Begin the video now.

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Video/DVD LG 22:1,3,6,9,10,11,12,13,14

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Break

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Your Pygmalion/Galatea Experiences Self-Study, Partner sharing Debrief LG – 23, 24, 25 Booklet – Page 5, 6

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What are your beliefs? Theory X/Y Raising Your Expectations of Your Employees Activity – self-study, debrief (A4 p9) The tough questions – discussion (read) Power Point LG 26 – 29 Booklet – Page 7, 9, 10, 11, 12

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The average person is, by nature, lazy and works as little as possible.

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The average employee lacks ambition, dislikes responsibility, and prefers to be led.

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The average employee is inherently self-centered and indifferent to the organization’s needs.

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The average employee is resistant to change.

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The average employee is not very bright.

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The average employee is not by nature passive or resistant – they become so, due to their experiences in the organization.

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On average, employees have the potential to develop be motivated, and have the capacity to accept responsibility.

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Employees can learn to adapt and experience the positives of organizational change.

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On average, employees have the potential to develop be motivated, and have the capacity to accept responsibility.

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Raising Your Self-Expectations Partners interview each other (?) including asking and writing (in their partner’s booklet what are your strengths, abilities, expertise, achievements, potential, things you’ve done well, hardships….) sharing at their level of comfort Debrief Power Point LG – page 30, 31 Booklet – page 13, 14, 15

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Lunch

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What are your beliefs?

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What are your beliefs? The Expectation Cycle The Four Factors Small Group Activity Debrief Questions page 25 Self-study factors 2, 3 Share one? Tips from others Power Point 4 flip charts with paper LG – 32, 33,43, 35 Booklet – 16, 17, 19

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What are your beliefs?

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The kind of social and emotional mood we create for others. “When we expect more favorable things of people, we create a more positive interpersonal climate for them.” -- Dr. Robert Rosenthal

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Negative non-verbal cues through voice, face and body posture or movements Verbally criticizing their competence or potential, talking down Being distracted, in a hurry, or otherwise not giving an employee your full attention (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing positive non-verbal cues through tone of voice, eye contact, facial expressions and body posture or movements Helping an employee set challenging goals Being verbally supportive and encouraging

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Negative non-verbal cues through voice, face and body posture or movements Verbally criticizing their competence or potential, talking down Being distracted, in a hurry, or otherwise not giving an employee your full attention (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing positive non-verbal cues through tone of voice, eye contact, facial expressions and body posture or movements Helping an employee set challenging goals Being verbally supportive and encouraging

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Negative non-verbal cues through voice, face and body posture or movements Verbally criticizing their competence or potential, talking down Being distracted, in a hurry, or otherwise not giving an employee your full attention (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing positive non-verbal cues through tone of voice, eye contact, facial expressions and body posture or movements Helping an employee set challenging goals Being verbally supportive and encouraging

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(The amount of information we give others) “We teach more to those from whom we expect more.” -- Dr. Robert Rosenthal

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Providing very limited information without reason - making an employee feel “out of the loop” Waiting too long to check on progress and provide any needed “course correction” Not giving an employee sufficient direction, guidance, information, resources to complete an assignment (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Giving enough resources or ideas without usurping ownership or “taking over” the assignment Providing an employee with ideas to follow up on or additional sources of information to use Spending “extra” time with an employee

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Providing very limited information without reason - making an employee feel “out of the loop” Waiting too long to check on progress and provide any needed “course correction” Not giving an employee sufficient direction, guidance, information, resources to complete an assignment (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Giving enough resources or ideas without usurping ownership or “taking over” the assignment Providing an employee with ideas to follow up on or additional sources of information to use Spending “extra” time with an employee

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Providing very limited information without reason - making an employee feel “out of the loop” Waiting too long to check on progress and provide any needed “course correction” Not giving an employee sufficient direction, guidance, information, resources to complete an assignment (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Giving enough resources or ideas without usurping ownership or “taking over” the assignment Providing an employee with ideas to follow up on or additional sources of information to use Spending “extra” time with an employee

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The amount of input we encourage from others. “We give more opportunity to those for whom we have more favorable expectations to express their questions.” -- Dr. Robert Rosenthal

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Cutting people off when they are speaking Not seeking their opinions or insights Limiting the number and scope of their work assignments (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing opportunities (e.g., training, projects) to learn or practice skills Providing exposure to and visibility within other areas or departments (especially upward in the organization) Assigning new, varying, multiple or incrementally challenging assignments

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Cutting people off when they are speaking Not seeking their opinions or insights Limiting the number and scope of their work assignments (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing opportunities (e.g., training, projects) to learn or practice skills Providing exposure to and visibility within other areas or departments (especially upward in the organization) Assigning new, varying, multiple or incrementally challenging assignments

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Cutting people off when they are speaking Not seeking their opinions or insights Limiting the number and scope of their work assignments (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing opportunities (e.g., training, projects) to learn or practice skills Providing exposure to and visibility within other areas or departments (especially upward in the organization) Assigning new, varying, multiple or incrementally challenging assignments

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(The information we give others in regards to their performance) “Managers give more positive reinforcement to high-expectation employees. They praise them more for good work and criticize them less for making mistakes. Consequently, their confidence grows.” -- Dr. Robert Rosenthal

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Making negative generalizations – defining a person by using negative labels Criticizing the person – focusing on traits instead of specific behaviors Being distracted, in a hurry, or otherwise not giving an employee your full attention (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing helpful suggestions on how an employee might be able to improve their performance Regularly reinforcing desirable behaviors with praise, recognition or rewards that are sincere and specific Reinforcing your belief in their ability to do better and your desire to see them succeed

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Making negative generalizations – defining a person by using negative labels Criticizing the person – focusing on traits instead of specific behaviors Being distracted, in a hurry, or otherwise not giving an employee your full attention (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing helpful suggestions on how an employee might be able to improve their performance Regularly reinforcing desirable behaviors with praise, recognition or rewards that are sincere and specific Reinforcing your belief in their ability to do better and your desire to see them succeed

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(Poor behaviors that communicate low expectations) Making negative generalizations – defining a person by using negative labels Criticizing the person – focusing on traits instead of specific behaviors Being distracted, in a hurry, or otherwise not giving an employee your full attention (Good behaviors that communicate high expectations) Providing helpful suggestions on how an employee might be able to improve their performance Regularly reinforcing desirable behaviors with praise, recognition or rewards that are sincere and specific Reinforcing your belief in their ability to do better and your desire to see them succeed

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Questions? (Action Planning summary) What additional knowledge, skills, behaviors must a positive-expectation-coach need to do well?   What will you do? – back to the chart done at the beginning of the class.   What is in it for the employee, your customer, you to coach using the power of positive expectation?

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Presents Learning and Professional Development

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Coaching with Positive Expectations Based on “The Pygmalion Effect” by CRM Learning

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“By the end of this program, you will be able to…” Objectives

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Explain the Pygmalion Effect (Pygmalion and Galatea I: The Heart Desires, painted by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones)

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Evaluate your Beliefs (Pygmalion and Galatea II: The Hand Refrains, painted by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones)

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Describe the Four Factors (Pygmalion and Galatea III: The Godhead Fires, painted by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones)

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Use the Four Factors (Pygmalion and Galatea IV: The Soul Attains, painted by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones)

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So what do you expect? Introductions

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παράδειγμα (paradeigma) Ground Rule for Today

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Challenge your Paradigms Duck or Rabbit?

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Challenge your Paradigms Duck or Rabbit?

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Challenge your Paradigms Duck Season or Rabbit Season?

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Challenge your Paradigms Duck Season or Rabbit Season?

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παράδειγμα (paradeigma) #1 Ground Rule for Today: Challenge your paradigms about people and work.

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The Pygmalion Effect ABCs

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We cannot behave or act in a manner that is inconsistent with our expectations & beliefs

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Our behaviors toward others influence their behaviors and performance

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Our expectations become a self-fulfilling prophecy

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The Pygmalion Effect What to Look for in the Video

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Page 7 Take notes on three accounts of Pygmalion:

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Page 7 at the school

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Page 7 at the vocational training

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Page 7 and at the paint company

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The Pygmalion Effect (Video Begin)

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The Pygmalion Effect (Video Debrief)

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Coaching with Positive Expectations Ten Minute Break

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Your Experiences Pygmalion/Galatia

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The Human Side of Work McGregor’s Theory

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Theory X The average person is lazy by nature.

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Theory X The average employee lacks ambition.

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Theory X The average employee is self-centered and indifferent.

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Theory X The average employee resists change.

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Theory X The average employee is not very bright.

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Theory Y The average employee is neither passive nor resistant by nature.

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Theory Y Employees have potential & capacity for development & motivation.

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Theory Y Employees can learn to adapt.

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Theory Y Management must create motivational conditions.

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McGregor’s Research/Self Expectations Theory X Theory Y

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Coaching with Positive Expectations One Hour Lunch

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Expectation Formations Looking at the Expectation Cycle

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We form expectations We communicate our expectations Our expectations are matched Our expectations come true

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Our expectations come true We communicate our expectations Our expectations are matched We form expectations

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Our expectations come true We communicate our expectations Our expectations are matched We form expectations

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Positive Expectations The Four Factors

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The Four Factors Flickr images by Spicy Bear

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Climate The tone of the environment we set: Supportive Communicative High expectations Input The amount of teaching, helpful information, and resources we provide (put into the success of the employee). Output The amount of opportunity we give people to learn and perform. Feedback The amount, quality, and tone of feedback we give regarding people’s efforts and performance.

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Climate “When we expect more favorable things of people, we create a more positive interpersonal climate for them.”

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Climate

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Climate

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Climate

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Input “We teach more to those from whom we expect more.”

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Input

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Input

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Input

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Output “We give more opportunity to those for whom we have more favorable expectations to express their questions.”

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Output

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Output

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Output

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Feedback “Managers give more positive reinforcement to high-expectation employees. They praise them more for good work and criticize them less for making mistakes. Consequently, their confidence grows.”

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Feedback

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Feedback

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Feedback

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What we set out to accomplish An Objective Review

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Explain the Pygmalion Effect Evaluate your beliefs about people at work Describe the Four Positive Expectation Factors Use the Four Factors to coach and communicate your expectations of others in the workplace

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Coaching with Positive Expectations To realize the full potential of organizations, we must believe in the full potential of our coworkers and staff, supporting this belief with positive and purposeful action.

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Thank You Learning and Professional Development

Summary: I designed this presentation while working for the State of Ohio's Department of Administrative Services in 2008/2009. We decided the Burne-Jones artwork was too risqué for participants so I removed it for the live presentation. This presentation and its message were intended for facilitation in front of a live audience.

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