ALCOP11 Presentation: Effective Presenting

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Slide 4

CLICK FOR MATTHEW. My name is Matthew Dyer. Improvise background. Mention history at OHFA and say, “they honored me with the 2007 employee of the year award, so naturally I moved on before they had a chance to think better of it.” STAND IN SCREEN. CLICK FOR HALO TO APPEAR ABOVE HEAD.

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How many of you have seen a handout like this before? How many of you expected a handout like this from me? I think we’re all pretty familiar with using powerpoint to create documents like this, because we’ve all received them. These “handouts” with the utlra neat lined sides that we take notes on instead of in our notebooks, are turning presentations into printed documents. In some cases this is okay - powerpoint makes it easy for you to show screenshots, and people tend to get upset if they don’t get the handout with the lines on the right-hand side. After all, where else are you going to take notes? Can you think of any other instances where the powerpoint handout might be useful? But let me give you some reasons powerpoint might not be the best medium you can use for creating documents. First, the material might already exist somewhere else in document form – be it a memo, a procedure manual, or some other kind of document. Putting it onto a slide doesn’t typically enhance the presentation experience for anyone involved, so why re-create that wheel? If you do choose to use Powerpoint for document creation, you run the risk of your audience reading your entire presentation before you’ve presented it. (Has anyone here done that? What happens to your attention span once you’ve read the whole thing? How interested are you in watching the rest of the presentation?) CLICK FOR “NO” DOCUMENTS. There’s a trend now to stay away from using powerpoint as a document creation, for many of these reasons, and a few more we’ll talk about later. So let’s move on to using powerpoint as a teleprompter.

Slide 21

TURN BACK TO AUDIENCE AND READ THE SLIDE WORD FOR WORD. Not very engaging is it? If you’re using the screen as a teleprompter, you’ll probably lose your audience. In a way it’s condescending. They can already read and don’t need you to do it for them. What else did you notice about this? (I had my back to the audience, I spoke in monotone, you couldn’t see my facial expressions – all important things to keep in mind when presenting. If you’re using PowerPoint as a teleprompter, and rely on it too much beyond actual “prompting” you will loose your audience. CLICK FOR “NO” TELEPROMPTING. So…

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…I’m not going to show you how to create documents or teleprompting scripts with powerpoint today, CLICK FOR DOCUMENT & TELEPROMPT EXIT ANIMATION. Rather, my intentions are to show you how to use powerpoint for its intended purpose which is to present presentations. That is, I’m going to show you…

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Well…I’ve searched the entire world…wide-web, and I’ve compiled 10-tips here that I’m going to share with you today – 10 ways I’ve found that can potentially spruce up your next presentation. A lot of my presentation to you today will focus on design, but I’ll be sure to give you some tips on using the actual software effectively, as well as provide you with information on where to go to learn more. But for now, let’s focus on the 10-tips which I affectionately call…

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Matthew’s Methods. (Let them read disclaimer)

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Any hunters in the room? Unless you hunt with a bow and arrow, what do you usually take with you? A gun. What do you load into that gun? Bullets. Are you going hunting when you’re designing a powerpoint presentation? No?

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It’s not hunting season, so leave the bullet points at home. Bullet points kill presentations. Why? Let’s take a look at some examples.

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Take a look at this still from a presentation about Windows Live by Bill Gates. ASK: Does this look like a powerful, inspiring, and motivating presentation? Does it look informative? Why or why not? ASK: What do you think happens to the audience while Mr Gates is talking (or reading from the screen)? Where is your attention? Are you listening to what he’s saying, or are you reading the information on the screen behind him? Or are you trying to do both whilst simultaneously writing furiously on the lined printouts he provided? The mind reads faster than one can speak, so if you were at this presentation, you’d have read the bullets behind Mr. Gates before he would’ve finished addressing the first key point. You know how to read, so you would’ve taken the information behind him, and your mind would have drawn its own conclusions, after which it would wander, wonder, and basically shut down. If you don’t take the steps you need to take to use fewer bullet points…

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If you don’t take the steps you need to take to use fewer bullet points…

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You could end up like this.

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We’re constantly bombarded with information and noise, our minds are constantly active, and our attention spans are becoming shorter and shorter – meaning we retain less and less overall. So, the last thing you need when you’re presenting is any more distraction than necessary. When you’re using PowerPoint to make your point, keep it simple. One idea per slide is typically enough to make your point, and to help make sure it sticks –because there are less distractions, your audience will retain more of what you’re telling them. Has anyone heard of K.I.S.S.?

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…that’s right. Keep it Short & Simple. This might be especially true when using graphics and clip art. (KISS EXERCISE)

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Now I hate to keep comparing apples to oranges CLICK FOR ANIMATION but these two gentlemen make it kind of easy. On the left is Steve Jobs, at a product launch presentation for…apple computers. On the right, Mr. Gates has returned and is still talking about all the things Windows Live should be able to do. It’s really uncanny how different their two approaches are – ASK: What are the major differences you see? ANSWERS MAY INCLUDE: Jobs’ is simpler, more direct; Gates’ is full to the brim, almost chaotic and overloaded. You can see that Gates’ presentation is definitely busier than Jobs’, perhaps overwhelming the audience with visual and auditory information, whereas Jobs’ presentation is much simpler, cleaner, and direct. Gates’ clip art might be relevant, but it’s overused. The trend now is to stick with one major idea per slide, with one major graphic to help support it – less is more.

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Now, I mentioned that I thought Mr. Gates used too much clip art – but what about the kind of clip art that he used? This leads into my third method…

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Clipart is Cliché. Let’s play a game. I’ll flash a word on the screen, and you tell me what image everybody uses for it (including you and me, because we’re all guilty of it) – I want the most common, clichéd metaphor for the word. Ready?

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Let’s start with an easy one. Idea – (response – “light bulb”)

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What about teamwork? (Response – “puzzle”)

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How about “Any questions”? (Response – “Question mark”) Of course, many of us DO have a question mark that floats over our heads…especially when we’ve just sat through a really bad presentation. Maybe this one isn’t so far off, after all.

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So when IS the last time you sat down with a jigsaw puzzle at a staff meeting? When’s the last time you had an idea, just as the electricity came on in the morning? Are the questions you want from your audience centered around the rules of punctuation? No? Then why use these images on your slides? We were able to come up with these answers pretty quickly together, which means we’ve seen them all before. They’re common. They’re forgettable. Why not try something new to really grab your audience’s attention? Here’s the deal, folks. I’m not saying all clipart is “wrong” or “bad,” or that there isn’t ever a place for common metaphors (of course there is – otherwise they wouldn’t be “common”), but my challenge to you is to think twice before you start searching for your next image. You can do this simply by asking yourself, “How does this image enhance this slide?” Soon you’ll start asking yourself, “How does this image enhance my presentation?” If the image does neither, then, why take up space with it? Now…how many of you have handshake clip art you might re-consider before you present again? ;)

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So if you’re using less clip art and less text, because less is more, you might have to conquer a common fear…

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Don’t be afraid of white space…Why? A couple reasons. Minimalist design can look cleaner and help you deliver your message more clearly, and, you don’t need to be worried about projecting white space. Ellen Finklestein, the author of How to Do Everything with PowerPoint 2007 , and 101 Tips Every PowerPoint User Should Know says “Brighter LCD projectors mean that you don’t have to turn off the lights in most rooms. With the lights on, white isn’t as glaring as it used to be. Web sites usually use a white background and presentation design has followed this trend. A plain background enhances the effect of images, which may be overwhelmed by a fancy background.” So don’t be afraid of white space. For that matter…

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…don’t be afraid of blue space.

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Speaking of blue space, let’s revisit to Steve Jobs and his presentation. Clearly he doesn’t let open space (blue or white) deter him. And the reason he does that is for focus – he knows that *he* is the presentation, and any slideshow is simply a supplement to his ideas – another medium for presenting them. Standing here on an empty stage does something else. It adds drama to his presentation, which helps the audience to focus on what really matters – the message that he’s delivering, and the story that he’s telling. It also builds his credibility. Coming out from behind the podium and interacting with his audience in front of a blank screen ensures the audience that he knows his material. He is the presentation, not his slideshow, note cards, or handouts. Jobs is a great presenter, and if you get a chance, you should check out some of his presentations on YouTube to really get a feel for how well he commands his crowd, and how effectively he uses slideshow design in his presentations.

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Another method that effective presenters like Steve Jobs utilize is that they …

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…get emotional. I learned something about the science of learning and how the brain works at a recent conference, and I’d like to share it with you. It has to do with the way the brain works – the way we retain information. Please, follow me in this exercise that the speaker walked us through. Close your eyes. Seriously, just do it. Now picture a lemon, yellow and bright, in the palm of your hand. Imagine the texture of the lemon peel against your hand – it’s smooth, but you can feel the duvets, and you can feel the end coming to a blunt points where the stem was. Now imagine that you’re cutting the lemon in half. You notice that the lemon suddenly smells strong, fresh, and clean in your nostrils. You can feel the juice running down your hand, the seeds spilling out as you squeeze it. Reach it up to your mouth, and bite it.

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Did you pucker? (I hope so, otherwise you’ll just think I’m citrus happy). If you puckered, that’s your brain playing tricks on you – but it’s a pretty powerful sensation. The basic idea is that the more emotion involved in your story, the more of the audience’s brains you as a presenter are engaging, and therefore the more of your key points will stick with your audience. Including emotion or sensation causes the brain to better latch on to the emotional hook, to the sensation, essentially combining & relating the information you’re presenting with that emotion, making it “stick” better with your audience. That’s why training programs will often combine storytelling with instruction. The story and emotion gets the synapses in your mind firing rapidly, and helps information stick, especially if it’s a story your audience can relate to.

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Visit Mindtools .Com for the six kinds of stories that work best for different situations in the workplace. But the one thing they have in common is that they: “Create an experience - Remember that when you tell a story, you're creating an experience for your listeners. Don't just use sound (words), but the other senses as well. Show your listeners the picture you're painting, don't just tell them. For example, it's easy to tell people that it's snowing outside. But if you want your listeners to really experience the snow, then describe how cold it is and the way the wind blows snow into your eyes. Tell them how you dream of a hot cup of cocoa after you're done shoveling snow in your driveway, and how your toes freeze because your boots aren't warm enough. Try to engage the five senses in every story: taste, touch, sight, hearing, and smell. They'll make your story come alive.” Make your presentations, and your PowerPoints, include sensation, story, and the emotional hook for better retention. Your audience’s brains will thank you for it …

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…well, most of their brains.

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(Alternate) The fifth method has to do with taking your presentation online. Webinars and virtual conferences are becoming the norm.

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The sixth method that I’d like to present to you has to do with finding inspiration. So many of us think that we’re just “not creative”. How many of you here feel that way? You just don’t know how to be creative or how those “creative types” come up with all their wacky ideas? The great thing is, you don’t have to be creative to be inspired. And if you really start paying attention…

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You’ll see that inspiration is everywhere, you just have to notice it. Billboards are a great example of this – think about why. They’re designed to promote one idea, using a (usually) relevant image, and leave their audience with just enough information to stick.

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Orange Barrel Media has some of my favorite examples of this locally. (Improvise description)

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Another example that I love. A Mini, the pebble of cars, set up as a slingshot ready to take out Goliath competition. I also love the irony of using a huge, larger than life advertisement to reference a giant’s defeat. Another source of information comes at you at least weekly, often on Sundays. Does anyone know?

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Comics! The Sunday funnies are a great place to look for design inspiration. The artist only has three or so panels to setup and deliver a punch-line. That’s not a lot of time or space to work with, but comic artists are masters at getting their point across quickly - so that it reaches our brains with just the right amount of information and timing to make us laugh. Can you imagine a comic that uses bullet points to convey ideas?

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Hm. Somehow it’s just not that amusing to me. CLICK FOR “NO”.

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One idea with enough visual impact to get the point across seems to work a lot better…

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A word on copyright…

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It’s best to avoid trouble in that area. Cite your sources, ask permission, or…

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Do it yourself. We’re in the digital age, and there are many resources available that can teach you how to do these things yourself.

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Share software update story.

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I’m lucky to work with Laura Solomon, who was voted one of Library Journal’s Movers & Shakers in 2010. She recently gave a class to me and the other HTML content editors of the State Library on writing better web content.

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Upgrade your software. There are too many good reasons to do it, and the benefits far outweigh the cost.

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You might have to fight with your IT department a little…

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And it might feel like a fruitless effort…

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…or a game of cat & mouse…

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But it’s worth it. The ‘07 version of Office is almost obsolete. If you’re still running 2003, start putting the pressure on to upgrade. You can do more with ‘07 - more features, better file compression, and the ability to test out new features like PPT – Plex. What is PPT Plex, you ask? Check this out: (demo)

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Since we’re talking about making being quick and efficient, let’s move on to the next method…

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It’s okay to take shortcuts. And when I talk about shortcuts…

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I’m mostly referring to the handouts you have in front of you.

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Keyboard shortcuts that look a lot like these, and I’ve tried to include some that will be useful for you both when you’re designing your presentation, and when you’re actually presenting it. For example, if you’re in the middle of a presentation and want to remove the on-screen visual for just a moment, maybe to wake up that guy in the back (Jeff, is that you?), hit B or W for a black or white screen. Then just hit the B or W key again to resume your presentation. DEMONSTRATE. Forget to cover something? If you know what number the slide was that you forgot, simply type the number and press enter to go to that slide. If your keyboard is closeby, it’s a lot easier to do than try to fuss around with left and right clicks. This is where it’s often helpful to have your presenter notes coincide with your numbered slides. So let’s say I forgot to mention something on slide 45. I’ll type it, and we’ll zip back to Garfield. When I want to come back, I can just type 50 and hit enter. DEMONSTRATE. See? There are a ton of simple tricks like this that can make you look like a PowerPoint Pro – and most of them are available right within PowerPoint’s help file. If you can’t find something you need, try Google (or maybe even ask a librarian?). By using keyboard shortcuts as you design and present…

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…you’ll save yourself, and your audience, precious time. Don’t limit yourself to just keyboard shortcuts as a means to save time. PowerPoint allows you to customize color schemes, master slide layouts, and note page layouts…

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So the next time you’re running late (like I was this morning), And you forget to bring that important thing (like I did this morning), And you still have finishing touches to add to your presentation (like I did this morning), You start to realize…

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Every second counts…

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The ninth method I’ve found has to do with using animations & slide transitions sparingly. Animations are a great way to create motion and continue ideas…

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…and like the rest of your slides, to help you tell your story. Animations can create continuity, combine several ideas together to form one cohesive thought, but…

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Fancy text animations and sounds are ways to get your audience’s attention, but over doing it can become more of a distraction than an asset to your presentation, especially when it comes to sound – imagine trying to talk over all this noise! If you’ve been following some of these methods, I’m hopeful you won’t need to rely on animations or sounds to maintain your audience’s attention. (Click for “no” & “explosion”) Unless it’s REALLY necessary.

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All this is leading up to my tenth method…

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…trash the default. CLICK FOR ANIMATION PowerPoint allows you to do so much more than list bullet points on a screen. It can be a useful tool to engage your audience and help you tell your story. Tap into your creativity, notice inspiration….

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Outline your thoughts and start with a blank canvas the next time you need to create a presentation. If you need more ideas,

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Read!

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Cliff Atkinson’s Beyond Bullet Points is a great place to start. Cliff gives great examples of using headlines to present, wrapping your presentation within “acts” (like a play) to help convey information, and even offers design tips. I’ve listed a few other resources on the front of your handouts that you can check out when you have time. I highly recommend the Nancy Duarte link.

Slide 106

And keep reading! I’ve listed some of my favorite websites on your handout – but there are plenty more out there. Set aside some time to “surf the net”. Learn about RSS feeds for an easy way to aggregate updates from your favorite websites and blogs; By subscribing to a site's feed in a news reader, like Google Reader, you will automatically be notified when that website contains new posts or entries. Instead of checking sites repeatedly for updates, RSS feeds bring your favorite websites to you!

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Practice using some of the more advanced features in PowerPoint, as well as practicing your presentation. One of the quickest ways to build confidence is to know your material. What are some other ways to practice? Jason Womack at Lifehacker.com recommends the following: Joining a speaking club (Toastmasters) Get involved to become more comfortable Record yourself Read Build & maintain a journal or weblog Watch a terrible presenter Set a goal for yourself

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So what have we learned?

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10 ways to keep your next powerpoint presentation…

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From stinking. (B/W)

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My name is Matthew Dyer.

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And this was powerpoint. What questions do you have before I leave you with a final thought? Final Thought: Sometimes It’s Rude to Point (See http://hityourstride.blogspot.com/2007/06/never-never-never-end-speech-with-q-and.html) Never Never Never End A Speech With Q and A Steve Hughes, The Presentation Guy Blog: Hit Your Stride

Slide 1

| this is powerpoint. | “When you resonate deeply with someone, you can change the world.” – Nancy Duarte | this is powerpoint. | “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” – Steve Jobs | this is powerpoint. | “Express your usefulness through simplicity.” – Garr Reynolds | this is powerpoint. |

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Hi.

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my name is matthew dyer. @mtthwdyr #ALCOP11 #MRDppt

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my name is matthew dyer. @mtthwdyr #ALCOP11 #MRDppt

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i work here.

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my name is matthew dyer. @mtthwdyr #ALCOP11 #MRDppt

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my name is matthew dyer. @mtthwdyr #ALCOP11 #MRDppt

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this is powerpoint.

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you may love it.

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you may hate it.

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you may love to hate it.

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why? it’s not rhetorical. is that. ?

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powerpoint can be confusing!

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presentations can be boring!

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powerpoint presentations can stink!

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this is powerpoint. (it doesn’t have to stink.)

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intentions. Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte

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document creation. Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte

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How many of you have attended presentations where the leader of the discussion reads, word for excruciating word, exactly what is written on the slide? How many of you found this to be stimulating? How many of you found this to stretch your thinking and hold your attention span? How many of you would rather eat dry, three-day old toast? teleprompting. Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte

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intentions. Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte presentations.

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put the power back in to powerpoint.

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how? it’s easier than you think.

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it’s easier than you think. 7 8 6 5 4 3 2 1 9 10

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matthew’s methods*. *Matthew is not a graphic designer nor is he a librarian. Matthew’s methods come from a variety of different sources which have been cited. Rarely, if ever, is a method presented actually Matthew’s, but he did go through the trouble of compiling them for you, so please don’t sue him. He’s a nice guy.

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matthew’s methods. 1

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bullet points kill presentations.

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how effective is this presentation? Image via Flickr user niallkennedy Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte

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(kill the bullet points before they kill you.)

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Image via Flickr user cogdogblog

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(the takeaway tweet.) bullet points can kill a presentation

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matthew’s methods. 2

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less is more.

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keep it short & simple. Image via eNR Services, Inc.

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Image via Flickr user mathoov Image via Flickr user niallkennedy Adapted from: “Gates, Jobs & the Zen aesthetic” by Garr Reynolds

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(the takeaway tweet.) less is more; shorter is sweeter

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matthew’s methods. 3

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clipart is cliché . Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte

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idea

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teamwork

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questions

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“If you feel tempted to use a picture of two hands shaking in front of a globe, put the pencil down, step away from the desk, and think about taking a vacation or investigating aromatherapy.” -Nancy Duarte, in Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds

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(the takeaway tweet.) clipart is caca

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matthew’s methods. 4

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don’t be afraid of white space Ellen Finklestein, author of 101 Tips Every PowerPoint User Should Know

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…or blue space.

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how effective is this presentation? Image via Flickr user mathoov

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(the takeaway tweet.) white space is a fine frontier

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matthew’s methods. 5

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get emotional. Adapted from: “Management Training: Why Does Most Training Not Work” by Scott Warrick

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make ‘em pucker. Adapted from: “Management Training: Why Does Most Training Not Work” by Scott Warrick

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create an experience. Adapted from: “Business Story-telling: Using Stories to Inspire” from MindTools.Com

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it usually works.

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(the takeaway tweet.) engage the senses when you present… ses

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matthew’s methods. 5

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don‘t let webinars become a trap.

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how effective is this presentation?

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how effective is this presentation?

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(the takeaway tweet.) woe to the weary webinar presenter

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matthew’s methods. 6

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inspiration is everywhere. Adapted from: “You are a Natural Born (Visual) Storyteller” by Nancy Duarte

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Image via Orange Barrel Media

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Image via Orange Barrel Media

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Image via Orange Barrel Media

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Reasons Garfield Hates Mondays They start with “M”. They aren’t Fridays. They sneak up on you. They have a bad reputation. They crush the human spirit. They crush the feline spirit. They don’t crush the canines.

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opyright

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ask for permission

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or D-I-Y.

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(the takeaway tweet.) presentation inspiration ain’t a source of perspiration

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matthew’s methods. 7

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state the headline (not the obvious). Adapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon

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Good: The library has storytime Better: Why your child needs storytime Best: How to increase your child’s literacy

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This Slide Is About Our Library The library has books The library has internet The library has classes The library has databases The library has storytime The library serves people The library serves a LOT of people Adapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon

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This Slide Is About Our Library The library has books The library has internet The library has classes The library has databases The library has storytime The library serves people The library serves a LOT of people Adapted from: “Writing for the Web” by Laura Solomon

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Our Library Increases Literacy

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(the takeaway tweet.) headlines sell better than flatlines

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upgrade your software.

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depending on your relationship with IT

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it may feel like a game of

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&

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it’s worth it.

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matthew’s methods. 8

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it’s okay to take shortcuts.

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your has some listed.

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they look like this

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and save lots of this

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running late ? Aak! I forgot to grab that very important thing I was supposed to grab!

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(every second counts.)

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(the takeaway tweet.) use shortcuts; every second counts

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matthew’s methods. 9

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animations & transitions can create motion

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& continue ideas.

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Introduction Good morning and thank you for letting me be here. Today I’m going to talk to you about using Microsoft PowerPoint. I’ll give you 10 tips that I’ve collected which are helpful for me, and might be just as helpful for you.

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(the takeaway tweet.) use animations & transitions cautiously

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matthew’s methods. 10

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trash the default. Method 1 Method 2 Method 3 Method 4 Method 5 Method 6 Method 7 Method 8 Method 9 Method 10

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start with a blank canvas.

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read.

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keep reading.

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practice.

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matthew’s methods. State the Headline It’s OK to Take Shortcuts Inspiration is Everywhere Avoid Webinar Traps Don’t Be Afraid of White Space ClipArt is Cliché Less is More Bullet Points Kill Animations Create Motion Trash the Default

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10 ways to keep this

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from turning into this.

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my name is matthew dyer.

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this was powerpoint.

Summary: An exclusive version of Effective Presenting for the Association of Library Communications and Outreach Professionals.

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