2 Hard Drive Technologies

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Hard Drive Technologies sunray @ PSIS

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Hard Disk Basics Hard disks were invented in the 1950s. They started as large disks up to 20 inches in diameter holding just a few megabyte. They were originally called "fixed disks" or "Winchesters" (a code name used for a popular IBM product). They later became known as "hard disks" to distinguish them from “floppy disk“. Hard disks have a hard platter that holds the magnetic medium, as opposed to the flexible plastic film found in tapes and floppies.

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Hard Drive Technologies Used by hard drive to interface with the system Used within hard drive to read and write data to the drive

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Hard Drive Subsystem

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Types of Hard Drive Interfaces

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EIDE Interface Standards Specify data transfer speed more than any other factor Considerations when selecting a standard Use fastest standard appropriate for range of the system and size of the drive Must be supported by the OS, system BIOS on motherboard, and firmware on the drive Ultra ATA/100: most popular

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ANSI Interface Standards

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EIDE Interface Standards (continued)

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IDE Cabling Methods

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IDE Cabling Methods (continued)

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IDE Cabling Methods (continued)

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EIDE Interface Standards (continued)

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Configuring EIDE Drives

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Configuring EIDE Drives (continued)

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Other Interface Standards

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How Hard Drives Work

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Spindle, Actuator,Platter, Read/Write Head

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Spindle, Actuator,Platter, Read/Write Head

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Spindle, Actuator,Platter, Read/Write Head

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How Hard Drives Work (continued)

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Tracks and Sectors on the Drive

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Tracks ,Sectors And Cylinder

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Tracks ,Sectors And Cylinder

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Cluster

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Tracks and Sectors on the Drive (continued)

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Low-Level Formatting

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Considerations When Purchasing a Hard Drive

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Communicating with the Hard Drive Controller

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Calculating Drive Capacity on Older Drives For drives less than 8.4 GB Determined by number of heads, tracks, and sectors on the disk, each sector holding 512 bytes of data

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Hard Drive Size Limitations

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How a Hard Drive Is Logically Organized to Hold Data Steps for preparing a hard drive to hold files Low-level format (usually done at the factory) Partitioning the hard drive High-level format

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Hard Drive Partitions and Logical Drives Active partition – It’s the bootable partition. OS installed in this partition. Only one drive can be set as the active partition on a computer Primary partition – The primary partition marked as active contains the OS. Also referred as System Partition Extended partition – Can be broken down into smaller drives accessible to the OS. These drives are referred to as logical partitions or logical drives Logical partition – Exists in an extended partition

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Partitions and Logical Drives

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Hard Drive Partition Table in MBR

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Choice of File Systems FAT16 Supported by all Windows systems FAT32 (and VFAT) Supported by Windows 95 Second Edition, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP NTFS Supported by Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP Each logical drive has its own file system

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Size of Logical Drives

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When to Partition a Drive First install a new hard drive Existing drive is giving errors Suspect a virus has attacked the drive Want to wipe a hard drive clean and install a new OS

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Installing a Hard Drive Set jumpers or DIP switches; physically install drive; attach power cord and data cable Inform CMOS of new drive If installing an OS on the drive, boot from OS setup CD (and skip next two steps) If drive is not intended to hold an OS, use Fdisk or Disk Management to create partition(s) and divide extended partition into logical drives For second drive, use Format command or Disk Management to high-level format each logical drive

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Prepare for Installation Read documentation Plan drive configuration Prepare work area and take precautions

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Jumper Settings

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Jumper Settings (continued)

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Jumper Settings (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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Mounting the Drive in the Bay (continued)

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If the Bay Is Too Large

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Use CMOS to Change Hard Drive Settings

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Setup for Large-Capacity Hard Drives

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Setup for Large-Capacity Hard Drives (continued)

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Setup for Large-Capacity Hard Drives (continued)

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Using Fdisk to Partition a Drive

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Using Fdisk to Partition a Drive (continued)

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Using Fdisk to Partition a Drive (continued)

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Format Each Logical Drive After using Fdisk, you must reboot the PC before you format the drive Commands used to format logical drives C, D, and E: Format C:/S Format D: Format E:

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Using Windows to Partition and Format a New Drive Boot from Window setup CD Follow on-screen directions to install Windows on new drive The setup process partitions and formats new drive before it begins Windows installation

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Troubleshooting Hard Drive Installations Check CMOS setup to verify that system BIOS recognizes large drives Verify status of Fdisk Verify that Format C:/S was done Check configuration of CMOS setup Confirm setting of DIP switches or jumpers Check connection of power cord and data cable Refer to Web site of manufacturer for suggestions

Summary: types of hard drives interfaces how hard drive works?

Tags: eide ide ansi pata sata

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