BreakingtheDependencyCycle.ppt.

+1

No comments posted yet

Comments

Slide 1

Break the Dependency Cycle: You Are in Charge of You Personal and Academic Strategies to Overcome “Learned Helplessness”

Slide 2

Many students come to college with Preference for multi-tasking Schedules structured by others Over-coaching for Sports Academics Standardized tests College and job searches Limited experience resolving conflict Very involved parents Extensive online relationships Less intense face to face relationship skills “Friend” taking on a different meaning

Slide 3

Dependency Cycle - Defined “A pattern of learned behavior that allows students to remain dependent upon the authority figure (parent, coach, professor or tutor) for learning” Source: “Breaking the Dependency Cycle.” SI Handbook. © Curators of the University of Missouri, 2003

Slide 4

Dependency Cycle - Causes An authority figure: structures the student’s time. solves the student’s problems. directly answers all of the students’ questions. is set up as the only source of information. The student: becomes unable to process and judge new information without help. Becomes unable to problem solve or resolve conflict independently

Slide 5

Dependency Cycle - Causes New information taught by: repetition drill memorization Students end up memorizing isolated facts, often missing the “big picture” needed in higher-thinking courses. Trophy Generation: Students over-awarded for minimal investment of time and for non-mastery of material Students defer to authority figures rather than accepting personal responsibility Adapted from: “Breaking the Dependency Cycle.” SI Handbook. © Curators of the University of Missouri, 2003

Slide 6

Dependency Cycle in Action Adapted from: “Breaking the Dependency Cycle.” SI Handbook. © Curators of the University of Missouri, 2003 Authority figure tells student Tells them again (when asked a question) Tells them more slowly (when asked again) Does it for them (to meet their needs, save time, cover more ground)

Slide 7

Dependency Cycle - Effects In Students When students are helped excessively, they “learn” that their own efforts are inadequate. This leads to the belief that they have no control over their ability to learn, resulting in lack of motivation. This feeling of no control can: reduce ownership diminish sense of responsibility create low self-esteem thwarts self-direction Source: Swinehart, Dawn. “Learned Helplessness.”

Slide 8

Are You Caught in the Dependency Cycle? Do you ask the same question repeatedly? demand too much time when being helped by others? place blame on others? make excuses? “I just can’t learn math.” “I’m bad at written tests, and I always will be.” “I will never use this information.” Attribute your success to an authority figure? “I couldn’t do it without your help.” “ I did well because the professor is an easy grader.” Adapted from: “Learned Helplessness.” WikEd.

Slide 9

Break the Dependency Cycle Act on advice from authority figures rather than expecting them to solve problems for you Focus more on learning processes than on outcomes. React to errors as natural and useful parts of the learning process rather than as evidence of failure. Provide yourself with time to practice Hold yourself accountable Self assess regularly If something is not working, don’t shut down; try a different approach Share your successes with others Adapted from: “Breaking the Dependency Cycle.” SI Handbook. © Curators of the University of Missouri, 2003

Slide 10

Dependency Cycle – Homework Use a strategy from this power point that can help you break the Dependency Cycle. Share with your Success Coach. Be prepared to share: name of strategy summary of activity how you used the strategy your opinion of strategy’s success

Slide 11

…but is this worth it? Is spending extra time to avoid the Dependency Cycle worth the effort? YES! Here’s why: As you “break the cycle,” you will study better on your own, improving your grades. Empowerment improves self-concept and motivation Everything can’t be covered in class or in a single tutoring session, so remember that you are able to learn without an authority figure managing you Overcoming “learned helplessness” will empower you to succeed in college and in life!

Slide 12

References “Breaking the Dependency Cycle.” SI Handbook. © Curators of the University of Missouri, 2003 Kenyon, C.A.P. “Learned Helplessness and Depression.” SALMON. 2006. 12 Aug 2008 <http://www.flyfishingdevon.co.uk/salmon/year2/psy221depression/psy221depression.htm>. “Learned Helplessness.” WikEd. 8 May 2008. 12 Aug 2008 <http://wik.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/Learned_Helplessness>. Swinehart, Dawn. “Learned Helplessnes.” Bureau for Students with Physical & Health Impairments. 2000. 12 Aug 2008 <http://education.gsu.edu/PhysicalDis/new/article/learned.html>. Tulgan, Bruce. Not Everyone Gets a Trophy. Jossey Bass: 2009

Summary: A workshop presentation to help you take control of your academics and life.

Tags: dependency cycle