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Slide 1

Historical Digital Literacy, One Classroom at a Time Organization of American Historians, April 2014 – Atlanta, Georgia The Future of Teaching History: Using Technology to Make Teaching More Fun & Effective Presenter: Tona Hangen, Worcester State University

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What’s New in History Teaching URL: tonahangen.com/teaching/oah14

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Paradigm Shifts in History Teaching & Learning Textbook-and-lecture Active learning

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Paradigm Shifts in History Teaching & Learning Textbook-and-lecture Active learning “What I teach” “What they learn” / Outcomes & Assessment

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Paradigm Shifts in History Teaching & Learning Textbook-and-lecture Active learning “What I teach” “What they learn” / Outcomes & Assessment Focus on single course Focus on curriculum

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Paradigm Shifts in History Teaching & Learning Textbook-and-lecture Active learning “What I teach” “What they learn” / Outcomes & Assessment Focus on single course Focus on curriculum Solitary Collaborative

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Paradigm Shifts in History Teaching & Learning Textbook-and-lecture Active learning “What I teach” “What they learn” / Outcomes & Assessment Focus on single course Focus on curriculum Solitary Collaborative Analog (At minimum) “computer enhanced”

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Paradigm Shifts in History Teaching & Learning Textbook-and-lecture Active learning “What I teach” “What they learn” / Outcomes & Assessment Focus on single course Focus on curriculum Solitary Collaborative Analog (At minimum) “computer enhanced” Limited sources Massive access

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Omeka How I use it: Web publishing and archiving of small-scale student local history projects, in multiple courses

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Wordpress How I use it: To externally host my own eportfolio and alternative course LMS Also: our preferred departmental platform for student eportfolios in the methods course + again in the senior capstone seminar

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Google Docs / Maps How I use it: Low stakes student collaboration in real time – usually for messy, quick, one-time use

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Wikis How I use it: Student project management, create permanent “auxiliary” site for special, long-term group work

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Digital Archives / OER How I use it: Open access to primary sources for research and analysis

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Digital Text Search Tools How I use it: Instantaneous searching across massive amount of text; permits asking new questions

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Crowdsourced Sites How I use it: Teaching close reading, deciphering handwriting, integrity of sources, authentic contribution

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Wikipedia How I use it: Teach information literacy & interrogating it as a (built) digital artifact

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Podcasting w/ Audacity How I use it: Student-created audio projects: podcasts, radio plays…

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Honorable Mention MIT Annotation Studio Will allow online, collaborative textual markup Still in development, but possibilities for sharing & knowledge-making on a larger scale Clickers Quick assessment for just-in-time and peer instruction, helpful in large classes Every student contributes, low stakes & anonymous

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Some Questions for Discussion Does “Active” = necessarily digital? Where/when to introduce? Bridging the gap w/o sacrificing rigor, depth, coverage? What tools, methods do our students MOST need in future? What tools, methods will aid their learning now? Are these the same?

Summary: OAH Teaching w/ Technology, Tona Hangen, Worcester State University, Atlanta 2014

Tags: oah2014 technology pedagogy history

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