Sell & Present Yourself

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[Click for text] Presenter 1 to Presenter 2: “Hey.” [Click to advance]

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[Click for text] Presenter 2 to Presenter 1: “You.” [Click to advance]

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[Click for text] Presenter 1 to Presenter 2: “Hey.” [Click for text] Presenter 2 to Presenter 1: “You.” [Click to advance]

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Presenters together, walking towards and talking to each other: “Hey You.”

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Presenters together, to the audience: “Hey You!” [Click to advance]

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It’s all about you! [Click to advance]

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It’s about your knowledge. [Click to advance]

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It’s about your skills. [Click to advance]

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It’s about your abilities. [Click to advance]

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It’s about your resume. [Click to advance]

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It’s about your research and career portfolio. [Click to advance]

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It’s about marketing yourself in the interview. That’s why… [Click to advance]

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It’s all about you. [Click to advance]

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Just you. [click to advance]

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And, of course, you are unique…[click to advance]

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Just like everyone else. [click to advance]

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So when you’re applying for a position, what can you do to stand apart from the crowd? [click to animate] [click to advance]

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Well that’s one way…[click to advance]

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But we’ve come up with a few better ways that we’re going to share with you today. [click to advance]

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We’d like to illustrate our point by starting off with a short activity. When you’re putting together career resources, you really need to sell & present yourself, the way you would if you were selling a car. So we’d like for you to think of yourself, [click to advance]

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As a car. You are the perfect car. [click to advance]

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What kind of car would you be? [click to advance]

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What kind of features would your car have that would make it sell? Would it be flashy and fast? Would it be reliable and sturdy? [click to advance]

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Why would someone buy your car [click to advance]

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Instead of the other cars on the lot? [click to advance]

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What makes your car – YOU? [click to advance]

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Take a minute to think of what kind of car you’d be. [click to advance]

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Take a minute to organize your thoughts, and then we’ll go around the room to hear your answers. [click to advance]

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Ready? [click to advance]

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Set? [click to advance]

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Get going! [click to advance]

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Time’s up – let’s get some of your answers. [click to advance]

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Let’s go around the room – tell us about your car – sell it to us. And remember, we can only buy one car – so why should it be yours? [click to advance]

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(Thank participants and segue into It’s All About You steps…”so when you’re building your resume, you’re really building up yourself – you’re taking the first step of selling & presenting yourself. What are some things you should include? How do you start”) [click to advance]

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Here are some steps to get you started. (click to animate) Gather information about YOU. (click to animate) Be specific about YOU. (click to animate) Be precise about YOU. (click to animate) [click to advance]

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Knowledge about what you do Communication Skills: Written ~ Oral ~ Listening Computer Software Skills Teamwork Skills Presentation Skills Skills in Leadership Skills in Project Leadership Ability to Problem Solve Ability to Resolve Conflict Read the KSAs very closely Review thoroughly all of your experiences relating to the KSAs of the job of interest Analyze the experiences you have identified Show how the facts you have gathered about your experience relate to the KSAs Over time everyone of us accumulates certain knowledge skills and abilities from life experiences, work and education. Think about what you bring to the table

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Knowledge about what you do Communication Skills: Written ~ Oral ~ Listening Computer Software Skills Teamwork Skills Presentation Skills Skills in Leadership Skills in Project Leadership Ability to Problem Solve Ability to Resolve Conflict Read the KSAs very closely Review thoroughly all of your experiences relating to the KSAs of the job of interest Analyze the experiences you have identified Show how the facts you have gathered about your experience relate to the KSAs Over time everyone of us accumulates certain knowledge skills and abilities from life experiences, work and education. Think about what you bring to the table

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The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition. "Knowledge a·bil·i·ties 1. The quality of being able to do something, especially the physical, mental, financial, or legal power to accomplish something. 2. A natural or acquired skill or talent. Skill : the ability to use one's knowledge effectively and readily in execution or performance b : dexterity or coordination especially in the execution of learned physical tasks3 : a learned power of doing something competently : a developed aptitude or ability

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Objectives Thinking about. . . Your objectives Type of job/position you want Full time, part time, internship, apprenticeship Industry Subject Area/level Skills you wish to use

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Have a clear written statement of your objectives. Begin by determining your objective (do this prior to writing the resume). Clearly state what sort of a job you want and know what skill-set and experience is needed to do well in that job. After your objective is determined, you can structure the content of your resume around that objective. 

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Past Achievements are. . . What you have done that is noteworthy Value-added activity, importance Show ability, independence, decision making, responsibility

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Past Achievements cont. Quantify if possible Should relate to skills you would need in the job you are seeking Should relate to processes addressed in job posting

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What to do. . . Keep a career portfolio to track assignments Keep your training up to date in HR Use your resume to plan for the future! What do you want your resume to look like in 5 years? Career Portfolios prepare you with the mindset and foundation for developing your career. During the development of your Career Portfolio you will think critically about your knowledge, skills and abilities. This will be key to completing your application, writing your résumé and marketing yourself in your interview. The initial creation of your Career Portfolio will be your biggest time commitment. Many career experts are emphasizing the importance of career portfolios. A career portfolio should be a clear and concise representation of your knowledge, skills and abilities. Reflect on your work, think of the many projects that you have completed. Think about any goals or standards that have been set for you along with your goals and standards and how you have met or exceeded them in your work. A career portfolio should be considered a living document. As you continue on your career path continually update your portfolio. The initial creation of your career portfolio will be your biggest time commitment, but well worth the investment of your time and effort.

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What is a resume? a short account of one's career and qualifications Comprehensive summary Concise, succinct, illustrative One piece of paper to say why you are the best for the job! Your résumé is a self-advertisement that showcases all your knowledge, skills and abilities. It contains well-written statements that highlight your previous work experience, education and other background information.

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Your Resume should portray your strengths Your Resume should show solid experience Your Resume should show what you have to sell YOU Your Resume should be proofread vigorously Highlight your strengths Highlight your strengths, and what is most relevant to the potential employer. In-coming resumes are typically reviewed in 10-30 seconds, so put forth the effort and determine which bullets most strongly support your job search objective. Put the strong and most relevant points first where they are more apt to be read. This is your hook for the reader, the rest of your resume reels them in.

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If you fail to plan, you plan to fail. . . Know the position Look at job posting and KNOW IT! Contact HR representatives Talk to supervisor Look at similar positions and their associated skills

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Know the position Look at job posting and KNOW IT! Contact HR representatives Talk to supervisor Look at similar positions and their associated skills

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Know the employer! Web page Mission statements Vision statements Marketing materials, “brand name,” public image Look at the language the public relations materials use

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Gather Information About The Job Classify each "duty and responsibility“ Read the job description specifically: Minimum Qualifications Read the class specification specifically: Minimum Qualifications and Job Duties in order of importance Highlight each minimum qualification and job duties

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MarketingSelling the Product…YOU (Eileen Clegg is a visual journalist and founder of Visual Insight where she creates visual maps of ideas by bringing together her experience with journalism, and art, which is part of an evolving visual language. The maps are created in real time on 4 by 8 foot murals featuring a combination of strategic quotes and ancient symbols and convey the "gestalt" of a meeting. Eileen Clegg was a daily news journalist for 20 years, has written numerous books and articles, has been affiliated with Institute for the Future conducting research on learning since 1999.)

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Selling Yourself Creating your own brand name What makes you the best person for the job? Try to make them see you. . . in one piece of paper Add a cover letter for a personal touch Connect yourself with the company Look at the web page, mission statements and branding; reflect their language in your resume Keyword searches for online job applications Show tasks related to the job If the posting gives any clue what the employer is looking for/leading language, attack that first!!!! Use active verbs - own your responsibilities

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Use Action Words Use action words – If your resume is scanned electronically, the computer will pick up on the words. You read correctly, some companies now scan in your resume, and have computers pull those that meet certain criteria. The computers are looking for one thing - they are looking for keywords that have been picked by the hiring manager. These are action keywords that relate to the position, so not including them could mean your resume is disregarded as a "non-match". List of these words can be obtained by clicking on the Resume Action Words located on the Resume Development page. (Fisher College of Business Career Services)

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Functional Resume Format When to Use:  The functional resume format is most commonly used by career changers who lack specific work history in the job field they are attempting to enter, but have transferable skills in this area.  Also, the functional resume format can be an effective resume format if the job seeker has past experience in a certain functional area, but recent experience does not reflect the specific function.  The functional resume format can also be effective if you have gaps in work history that you are trying to hide. Combination With this format, skills that are relevant to the current job search are placed in a special section by function, while the Professional History or Work Experience is presented in a standard, reverse-chronological format. This format offers the best of both worlds, and is highly popular with modern job seekers and hiring managers. Reverse Chronological Resume Format

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Functional Functional formats stress what skills you have, rather than where and when you used them. These formats are best for students who have just graduated from college and have little “real-world” experience, those who have been out of the workforce for long periods because they were raising children, and job seekers who are transitioning from one career or industry to another. However, sometimes combining a functional format with a reverse chronological format makes the most sense. These are called combination resumes. Functional Resume Format Breakdown:  The functional resume format uses a summary introduction section followed by a detailed description of the job seekers skills and expertise in specific functional areas.  This "functional" section serves as the main area of content.  Work History will be listed below (usually in reverse chronological order).  Work History is represented as a simple listing and does not include descriptions of the job.  Education and other sections are listed below.  Example Functional Resume Breakdown: SummaryAccounting ExperienceBanking ExperienceWork HistoryEducation When to Use:  The functional resume format is most commonly used by career changers who lack specific work history in the job field they are attempting to enter, but have transferable skills in this area.  Also, the functional resume format can be an effective resume format if the job seeker has past experience in a certain functional area, but recent experience does not reflect the specific function.  The functional resume format can also be effective if you have gaps in work history that you are trying to hide.

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Functional Pros Easy way to illustrate skills necessary for a specific objective Emphasizes skills, not job titles Helps organize employment histories that are widespread Cons More difficult to write Harder to design

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Reverse chronological Generally speaking, hiring managers prefer that employment data is provided with the most recent job listed first, followed by the next most recent, and so on. In that way, it’s easy to see career progression from an entry-level position to a more senior status. It’s also easy to detect gaps in dates of employment. These gaps lead some candidates to use a functional format instead. When to Use:  The reverse chronological resume format is most commonly used by professionals with solid work history and tends to be the preferred resume format by the employer.    Reverse chronological Generally speaking, hiring managers prefer that employment data is provided with the most recent job listed first, followed by the next most recent, and so on. In that way, it’s easy to see career progression from an entry-level position to a more senior status. It’s also easy to detect gaps in dates of employment. These gaps lead some candidates to use a functional format instead. format by the employer.   

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Reverse Chronological Resume Format Breakdown:  This resume format starts with a brief summary or objective section.  Qualification Highlights sections are optional and are considered to be part of the summary section.  Experience is then listed to follow the summary.  Job descriptions are listed in reverse chronological order starting from most recent experience to least recent experience.  The education section is next and then can be followed with additional sections such as:  Publications, Professional Affiliations, Awards, Honors, Volunteer Work, etc. When to Use:  The reverse chronological resume format is most commonly used by professionals with solid work history and tends to be the preferred resume format by the employer.   

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Chronological Resumes Pros Great if skills and achievements can best be illustrated by work experience (easy to associate with a particular job) Easy to read and most people (including hiring offices) are more comfortable/familiar with it Easy to write Cons Some may see skills as outdated if technically oriented Relies on upkeep of career information

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Combination With this format, skills that are relevant to the current job search are placed in a special section by function, while the Professional History or Work Experience is presented in a standard, reverse-chronological format. This format offers the best of both worlds, and is highly popular with modern job seekers and hiring managers.

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There is no such thing as a “one size fits all” in resumes Customize for the position Recall language in posting Mission, vision, marketing REMEMBER - update your career information!!!!! Match the need they haveMatch the need they have - Review job postings . Use the keywords in the job posting or advertisment, and match them to the bullet points in your resume. Chances are that you have some of these as key points already, however if you have missed any, add them to your resume. Using a custom resume instead of a generic one will greatly increase your chances of an interview, as you will be a better match in the eyes of the reader.

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The Position Description (or “PD”) outlines the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities necessary to possess for a particular position.

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How many get nervous? Why? Don’t know answer and want to answer accurately One way to do that is Prepare. If you fail to prepare, you may as well prepare to fail! You can prepare using the same strategy as Ralph explained Just like a written test, interview questions are based on KSA’s – know something about KSA’s and give example of some of the experiences on the job you have had relating to the various KSAs

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The preferred interview for state employees (recommended by DAS) is the structured interview and specifically the structured panel interview. Structured interview is defined as – above.

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The typical unstructured interview, conducted by a highly experienced interviewer, had a reliability of predicting job performance of about 15 – 30%. By contrast… A structured interview, based on a job analysis, using rating scales, could achieve up to 87% reliability in predicting job performance.

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See above Why this type of interview recommended? Quite a few studies on various types of interviews.

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Behavioral questions: You are asked to describe situations you have faced and how you handled them. The underlying assumption behind these types of questions is that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior in similar circumstances. Situational Questions: A hypothetical job-related situation is posed to you and you are asked what you would do in that situation. The underlying assumption there is that candidates will reply with what they would do in a given situation. Technical or job knowledge questions: Questions about technical or basic knowledge required to perform the duties and responsibilities of the position. I’ve seen all three types of questions asked in interviews around the Commission and with other employers.

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Some people think get interview, show up and answer questions, but the truth of the matter is that there is work to be done before going to the interview. There are tasks to complete before, during and after interview to ensure your best chance for success So your motto every time you go for an interview must be prepare, prepare, prepare! Know your product! You Keep in mind that every interview is a learning experience and learning takes place in all phases including preparation.

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There are several activities that can help you prepare to put your best foot forward. Review Job of Interest Posting and Position Description and focus on the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to do the job. Again, this should be the basis for the interview questions. Study any regulation references, talk with the workers and supervisors in the area where you are applying if you can, and research any other pertinent information about the job. Assess your own skills, accomplishments and achievements. It’s a good idea to keep an ongoing accomplishments file containing information such as congratulatory letters, kudos from customers/bosses, and descriptions of successful activities as they occur (fresh in your mind). Be prepared to discuss your career in a way that displays and highlights your accomplishments/achievements. Determine your transferable skills. Share these skills with examples to the interviewers. Those skills may not always be evident to the employer based on your work experience or education. Update your resume The accomplishments file can serve as a springboard to refreshing your resume Determine as much as possible the employer’s needs in the job. Again, if you can, go beyond the PD and ask those working in the area about the area If interviewing outside of the PUCO, research information about the company: industry outlook, competitors, market share, products and services, location of offices, etc. Based on the job description, posting and any other information you have obtained, try to determine the questions that may be asked. Then, practice, practice, practice Ask your friend, spouse, etc. to practice interviewing you. Have answers in mind to commonly asked questions such as “what are your skills, education and experiences as it relates to this job” Video or audio tape your practice Practice in the mirror to make sure you aren’t answering using annoying gestures or body movements Giving a great interview is a skill and the more you practice the better you will become at interviewing. Also, the more you practice, the less nervous you will likely be. Record the exact date, time and place of the scheduled interview I have had the experience several times where applicants showed up either on the wrong day or wrong time. I wasn’t impressed. Make sure you know who you will be interviewing with and know how to pronounce their name. Prepare questions for the interviewer. This will impress him/her and let them know that you have taken the time to actually prepare. Examples: Can you describe a typical day for this position? What is your management style? What is the culture of your company/dept.? What are the best things about working here? Why did the person vacate this job? What training do you offer? What is the biggest challenge in this position? Decide before the day of your interview what you are going to wear. Remember, a person’s first impression is usually the lasting impression.

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On the actual day of the interview, you need to make sure you arrive on time. You can arrive early, but protocol is that you shouldn’t arrive more than 15 minutes early. If for some good reason you can’t avoid it and you will be late, call beforehand to explain the situation. If it’s a good reason, most employers will understand. Reschedule the interview if necessary.

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Be very specific and detailed in your responses. Look for opportunities to personalize the interview. Briefly answer questions with an example of how you may have responded in a similar situation from previous job experiences. Make sure you give a complete description of event -- The actual situation, the actions you took in that situation and the outcome of the situation. Don’t be afraid to ask the interviewers to repeat the question if you don’t understand it the first time. Avoid talking ill of your current or former employers. Always try to put a positive spin on things. NEVER lie or avoid answering a question. Do not say, “You can find that on my resume”. They want to hear it from you personally and how you interact with others and your personal knowledge base. Also, if you don’t actually answer the question in detail, they won’t have anything to rate you on and you’ll lose points. Assume the panel does not know you.

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During the interview, you may be asked to do an activity that simulates the job. The activity simulates the types of situations you would encounter on the job. One of the simulations used in the Commission is the Role Play. In a role play the employer is looking for: How well you communicate, and How well you think on your feet You can prepare by finding out the major everyday tasks performed on the job. The role plays and other simulations are usually patterned after those tasks.

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Finally, the most frequent reasons employers give for not offering someone a job are: See above Just for grins and examples of what not to do while interviewing, I want to share with you a list of interviewing blops and blunders. Top personnel executives of 100 major American corporations were asked to provide stories of unusual behavior by job applicants. These are some of the answers. (READ THE ANSWERS)

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(Hay.)

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(Ewe.)

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(Hay.) (Ewe.)

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(Hey.) (You.)

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Hey You!

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It’s All About Yo !

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Yo r knowledge.

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Yo r skills.

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Yo r abilities.

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Yo r resume.

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Yo r portfolio.

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Yo r interview.

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Yo .

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Just. (Ewe.)

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And ewe are unique…

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…just like everyone else.

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So how do yo stand apart from the crowd?

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(That’s one way)

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(Here’s a better way)

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Think of yo rself …

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As a car.

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What kind of car would yo be?

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What features would make it sell?

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Why would someone buy yo r car…

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Instead of any other car?

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(What makes it ewe-nique?)

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Take a minute to think.

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Take a minute to write.

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Ready?

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Set?

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Go for it!

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Time’s up.

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Tell us about yo r car.

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Be Precise Be Specific Gather Information

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What do yo bring to the table?

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Skills Abilities Knowledge

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Assessing Yourself Past, present and future Objectives Past achievements Past experiences Education, training, skills, proficiencies Sum total is your Career Information

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Clarify your Objectives

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Seeking a full-time career position in the commercial freight industry To obtain an internship in marketing To apply my leadership, analytical and communication skills in a management position Seeking an entry level position in Management and/or Human Resources Samples

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What have you achieved?

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Quantities count. (So count quantities.)

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Start a career portfolio.

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Writing your Résumé

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Portray your strengths.

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Research.

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Know the position.

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Know the employer.

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Know the job.

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What the experts say. . . “I want to see that the person has read the posting, read the offer, and has addressed my desires for the position.”

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The ultimate creative act is to express what is most authentic and individual about… -Eileen M. Clegg

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Selling Yourself.

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ACTION WORDS activate demonstrate launch prove adapt effect lead/led provide administer eliminate lecture recommend analyze establish maintain reduce approve evaluate manage reinforce coordinate expand motivate reorganize conceive expedite organize revise conduct found originate schedule complete generate participate solve control increase perform strategy create influence plan streamline delegate implement pinpoint supervise develop interpret present support direct improve propose teach

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Choosing a resume type.

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Functional List experience by knowledge areas. Example: Leadership Experience Project Management for new Information Systems (Target Corp) Managed Customer Service Center (Southern Bell Corp) Directed sales for Midwest region for large computer corporation (Dell)

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Functional

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Reverse Chronological

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Reverse Chronological Lists experience in reverse chronological order. Example Public Utilities Commission (1996-present) Position x Active roles Johnsonville Sausage Co. (1994-96) Position y Active roles

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Reverse Chronological

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Combination

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Presentation “You”.

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Tailor business needs to your skills.

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Interviewing

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Interview Preparation

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Researching the Job of Interest The Job of Interest Position Description (PD) Major duties Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs)

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Interviewing Preparation, Tips and Practice

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Objectives Research Interview Types Interview Preparation What to Do During the Interview

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Structured Interview Defined as: A standard set of questions that are asked of every person interviewed for a particular position.

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Interview Type Study Results (Wiesner and Cronshaw – 1988) Unstructured interview yielded 15 – 30% reliability in predicting job performance Structured interview yielded 87% reliability in predicting job performance

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Structured Panel Interview Characteristics Same questions asked of everyone Responses evaluated and scored Pre-set criteria More than one person interviewing candidate Selection made by panel consensus

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Use of Panels Study Results (McDaniel, Whetzel, Schmidt, & Maurer – 1994) Panels more valid than individual interviews Interviews rated based on panel consensus, validity was even higher

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Types of Structured Interview Questions Behavioral questions: describe situations you have faced and how you handled them Situational Questions: hypothetical job-related situation, what would you do in that situation Technical or job knowledge questions: technical or basic knowledge required to perform the duties of the position

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How to Prepare Before the Interview Interview Motto: Prepare Prepare Prepare

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How to Prepare Before the Interview Review Job of Interest Posting and Position Description Assess your own skills, accomplishments and achievements Update your resume Determine questions that may be asked Practice, Practice, Practice Record date, time, location of interview Prepare questions for the panel Determine your dress the day before the interview

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What to Do During the Interview Greet the lead interviewer by name Give a firm handshake Maintain eye contact with everyone Speak in a strong confident voice Pace your words so the interviewers can take notes easily Maintain a pleasant demeanor Listen carefully to each question asked & take your time responding

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What to Do During the Interview Be very specific and detailed in your responses Personalize the interview Do not be afraid to have the question repeated Avoid negatives about current or former employers NEVER lie or avoid answering a question

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What to Do During the Interview Be prepared for a job simulation Activity that simulates the kind of tasks to be performed on the job Common one is a Role Play Close interview on friendly, positive note Summarize your qualifications

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Common Reasons You Won’t Hear “You’re Hired” Inappropriate appearance Being late Appearing disorganized Poor communication skills Defensive attitude Criticism of past employer Lack of confidence Sarcasm, aggression or rudeness Tendency to make excuses or blame others Poor references

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Additional Resources www.das.ohio.gov/hrd/Training/CareerPlanning Monster.com Yahoo Hot Jobs Colleges and Universities Web search for resume examples

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Special Thanks Benjamin Stafford and The Human Resources Staff The Public Utilities Commission

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Summary: I designed this presentation while working at the State of Ohio's Department of Administrative Services in 2008/2009. This presentation and its message were intended for facilitation in front of a live audience.

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